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From Private To Field-Marshal

by Field-Marshal Sir William Robertson, bart., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., K.C.V.O., D.S.O.

"Scarlet coat to red-tabsIt is a common aspect of uncommon men that their lives are so exceptional that they cannot be adequately described in a few words. So much the better then that the author of this autobiography left posterity his remarkable life story.William 'Wully' Robertson was born in Lincolnshire in 1860 and became a servant in the household of the Earl of Cardigan. In 1877 he decided upon a military career and enlisted as a trooper in the 16th (The Queen's) Lancers. He proved to be an outstanding soldier and encouraged by friends and especially the officers of his regiment, Robertson earned a commission in 1888. This was an incredible achievement at the time since only four or five 'rankers' were so promoted annually. Robertson transferred to the 3rd Dragoon Guards. Having no private means Robertson struggled to maintain the lifestyle of a Victorian cavalry officer and had to work hard to generate extra income. A posting to India gave him the opportunity to do so through proficiency in languages. By 1895 he was a captain serving in the Chitral Campaign and in 1998 attended the staff college at Camberley--the first 'ranker' to go there.The Boer War saw further promotion and during the First World War--after service in the B. E. F.--Robertson rose to become Chief of the Imperial Staff being appointed to full general in 1916. He became a baronet in 1919 and field-marshal in 1920-the first man who joined the British Army at its lowest rank and by his own abilities achieved its highest rank.This is nothing less than a fascinating account, touching as it does on many aspects of military life as well as minor campaigns and major conflicts of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Recommended."--Leonaur Print VersionAuthor -- Field-Marshal Sir William Robertson, bart., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., K.C.V.O., D.S.O., 1860-1933Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, Constable and company ltd., 1921.Original Page Count - xix and 396 pages.Illustrations - 1 Portrait.

Maple Leaves In Flanders Fields

by Admiral Sir Albert Hastings Markham K.C.B. Herbert Rae

It was the celebrated Canadian physician and poet Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae that wrote the famous lines "In Flanders fields the poppies blow" as an opening to his famous poem 'In Flanders Fields'. His countrymen had shed their blood copiously in fighting the Germans on the Western Front and earned an outstanding reputation as fighting troops. Despite perhaps lacking a bit of 'spit and polish', they would be exchanged by no Allied commander for other troops.His compatriot George Gibson wrote 'Maple Leaves in Flanders Fields' as a lasting testament of the achievements and character of his fellow Canadian soldiers. His book is not a bold statement of the engagements, battles and victories that the Canadians were involved in, but rather the story of the Canadians by a Canadian with a humorous tone and self-effacing modesty. Although there are many battle scenes depicted with great skill and vividness, it is perhaps the moments of quiet that display the character of the Canadian troops most; for example, an exchange at a hand-over of the line:Sentry. "Halt! Who goes there?"Answer. "First Grenadiers."Sentry. "Pass, first Grenadiers; all's well." Sentry. "Halt! Who goes there?"Answer. "What the Hell is that to you?" Sentry. "Pass, Canadians; all's well."A fine testament to the achievements and noble sacrifice of the Canadian Corps on the Western Front.Author -- Gibson, George Herbert Rae, 1881-1932Introduction --Admiral Sir Albert Hastings Markham, K.C.B. (11 November 1841 - 28 October 1918)Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, Dutton, 1916.Original Page Count - xi and 268 pages.

With The Fleet In The Dardanelles, Some Impressions Of Naval Men And Incidents During The Campaign In The Spring Of 1915

by William Harold. D. Price Sir Everard Fraser K. C. M. G.

As warfare ground to a halt in the static, bloody trenches of the Western Front in 1914, the Allied command sought to lever Germany's Turkish allies out of the war. Although the British had but a small standing peacetime army, she possessed the largest fleet in the world, and planned to use the awesome power of her huge naval guns to blast a passage through the Turkish defences of the strait. Constantinople would thereby be threatened and Turkey forced to sue for peace. The plan was bold, ambitious and doomed to fail.As the confident fleet steamed up through the Mediterranean, Padre Price kept a diary of his experiences and anecdotes of the Jolly Tars. However, his notes are filled with danger and bloodshed as the fleet encounter the brave and stubborn shore batteries, taking its baptism of fire. Though gallant and bloodied by the shells of the enemy, the fleet could not force the passage - a fateful failure that would lead to the landings at Gallipoli and further allied failures. Author -- Price, William Harold. D. 1917Preface -- Sir Everard Fraser K.C.M.G. (1859-1922)Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, A. Melrose, ltd. 1915Original Page Count - xvi and 124 pages.Illustrations -- 6 Illustrations.

My Escape From Donington Hall, Preceded By An Account Of The Siege Of Kiao-Chow In 1915

by Kapitänleutnant Gunther Plüschow

"An outstanding story of the aerial war and a daring escape from captivity.For the uninitiated this book's original title, 'My Escape from Donnington Hall,' gave few clues as to the astonishing and unique nature of its contents. Its author was a young German, Gunther Plüschow. As an airman in German service at the outbreak of the First World War he was, unusually, serving in China flying a Rumpler-Taube aircraft from the East Asia naval station at Tsingtau that became besieged by joint Japanese and British forces. Plüschow's attempt to fly to safety, as it became obvious the position would fall, ended in a crash in rice paddies. He set out to walk back to Germany and the many adventures that followed would alone would qualify his story as a remarkable one. However, he was eventually captured and became a prisoner of war. Stories of wartime escape abound, but those who have been incarcerated in England have always been confounded by the difficulties of quitting an island.' In Plüschow's case this was exacerbated since in the east he had acquired a distinctive dragon tattoo; yet Plüschow he succeeded and is the only prisoner of war to escape from Britain and make the 'home run.' His remarkable narrative of his wartime adventures makes absolutely essential reading and is certainly beyond compare."-Leonaur Print version.Author -- Kapitänleutnant Gunther Plüschow 1886-1931.Translator -- Pauline De Chary. D. 1943Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, John Lane, 1922.Original Page Count - vii and 243 pages.Illustrations -- 2 Illustrations.

The Spider Web, The Romance Of A Flying-Boat War Flight [Illustrated Edition]

by Anon, “P.I.X”

"War at sea-war in the air--This is an account of the early days, during the Great War, of the service that became the Fleet Air Arm. It did not take long after hostilities commenced for the Royal Navy to appreciate the potential of an 'air force' both as an eye in the sky and as an effective method of countering enemy surface vessels and most especially German submarine activity. Endurance, speed and surprise were the essential components of the sea-plane and flying boat war. Appearing suddenly out of the sun, a surface cruising U-Boat had little time to dive to safety before destruction rained down upon it. This book contains may gripping incidents of U-Boat hunting in the 'Spider Web', a great tract of the North Sea which was the Navy flyer's patrol area and battlefield. This was a hard war, fraught with dangers from mechanical breakdowns, attacks from enemy aircraft, lethal weather and anti-aircraft fire among its many perils. A riveting account of the sea and early aviation warfare."-Leonaur Print version.Author -- Anon, "P.I.X"Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in Edinburgh, W. Blackwood and sons, 1919.Original Page Count - x and 278 pages.Illustrations -- 20 maps and Illustrations.

"Ladies From Hell,"

by Robert Douglas Pinkerton

"With the London-Scottish Regiment During the First World WarThe 'Cockney Jocks' at war in Flanders and FranceThe wide distribution of Scots throughout Britain and the Empire led to the formation new 'Scottish' regiments and the London Scottish, formed in 1859 as a volunteer rifle corps and originally commanded by Lord Elcho, was a primary example. Elcho, anxious to embrace all the fighting men of Scotland into one brotherhood irrespective of their clan origins, uniquely clad the regiment in kilts of 'Hodden Grey,' a traditional hard wearing Scottish homespun cloth devoid of the tartan check and, as he perceived, being a drab colour suited for life on military campaign in the most practical way. Pinkerton, the author of this book was a soldier among the ranks of the regiment who answered the nation's call to arms during the First World War. The regiment was mobilised at the outbreak of hostilities and the 1st battalion had the distinction of being the first Territorials to go into action during operations at Messines in October 1914. Pinkerton takes his readers to war with the London Scottish on the western front where it took part in all the major offensives of the conflict. Predictably this vital account is filled with immediate first hand account action and anecdotes and is essential reading for anyone interested in the war in the trenches the kilted infantry knew."-Leonaur Print VersionAuthor -- Pinkerton, Robert Douglas.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, The Century co., 1918.Original Page Count - 254 pages.

With The Twenty-Ninth Division In Gallipoli, A Chaplain's Experiences. [Illustrated Edition]

by Rev Creighton Oswin

"The padre of the 86th Brigade, 29th Division, gives an account of his experiences at Gallipoli where he landed on 25th April 1915 to his evacuation on medical grounds on 12th August....it covers the period 27th January 1915, when he reported to the HQ of the newly formed 29th Division in Leamington, to 12th August 1915 when he arrived in Alexandria having been evacuated sick (diphtheria) from the Peninsula. The 86th Brigade was a Fusilier Brigade with 2nd Royal Fusiliers, 1st Lancashire Fusiliers, 1st Royal Munster Fusiliers and 1st Royal Dublin Fusiliers, and it was the first to land on 25th April 1915. It was with the first two mentioned that Creighton had most contact and they feature prominently in this account. The other two battalions, being recruited mainly from the south of Ireland, were predominantly RC.Creighton had come straight from civvy street and took a little while to find his feet among regular troops....This account is based on his diary and he took pains to write only what he got firsthand and from personal observation and he has tried to be as accurate as possible.The interesting photos were borrowed from the CO of 2nd RF and his narrative does give a feel for the conditions and fighting on the Peninsula. At one stage he gives vent to his feelings after a fruitless attack by a brigade of the newly arrived 52nd (Lowland) Division which cost over fifty percent casualties: "These things seem to happen every battle. The amount of unnecessary lives simply thrown away is appalling."...The book closes with a chapter by the BM, Major H.M. Farmar, on the landing of the 86th Brigade and the subsequent operations till 3rd May."N&M print versionAuthor -- Rev. Creighton Oswin, 1883-1918Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, Longmans, Green and co., 1916.Original Page Count - xiv and 191 pages.Illustrations -- 26 maps and Illustrations.

The Dardanelles Campaign [Illustrated Edition]

by Henry Wood Nevinson

Henry Wood Nevinson, surely thought that he had seen everything that war could throw up; as a seasoned war correspondent, he had followed the British forces in many campaigns including the second Boer War where he was stranded in Ladysmith during the siege. However his experiences during the First World War would shock him, he travelled to France and witnessed the initial clashes of the War. He then accompanied the troops to Gallipoli, being wounded in the process of his reporting. His experiences in the Peninsula would form the basis of this book.His account of the Dardanelles campaign covers all of the action from the initial planning stages on the Admiralty's drawing boards, through the naval attacks to the landings and the struggle amongst the deadly rocks and beaches of Gallipoli. Nevinson was careful to check and re-check his information, using numerous illustrations and staff maps for accuracy. It is clearly one of the best eye-witness written campaign studies of the terrible struggles of 1915 on the shores of Turkey.Highly recommended.Author -- Nevinson, Henry Wood, 1856-1941.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, H. Holt & co., 1919.Original Page Count - xx and 427 pages.Illustrations -- 16 maps and Illustrations

Through The Hindenburg Line; Crowning Days On The Western Front

by Frederick Arthur Mckenzie

Arthur McKenzie was a member of the fiercely proud band of Canadians who made that trip across the Atlantic to fight alongside the British other Dominion troops. He served from the days of 1915 to the end of the war in 1918, surviving the many terrible dangers of the front-line. He recounts the tales of the band of brothers that he fought with, and the "family" feeling that permeated the Candian troops from the commanding General right down to the lowliest private.The author's main focus is in describing his experience in the battles that he took part in during 1917 and 1918 as the title suggests including at Vimy ridge and at Passchendaele and Amiens in 1918. He describes the different elements of trench warfare, from raiding the enemy line with knob-kerries and grenades, to the shelling, tanks and mayhem of a full offensive "push".A great First World War Memoir.Author -- McKenzie, Frederick Arthur, 1869-1931Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, Hodder and Stoughton, 1918.Original Page Count - 429 pages

Gallipoli [Illustrated Edition]

by John Masefield

Few accounts of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign are as famous as that of John Masefield, and justly so, for so few have captured the danger, death and heroism on the Peninsula. He saw service as a Red Cross orderly in France and sought to alleviate the plight of the soldier and volunteered his services to motor boat ambulance seeing the battles first-hand. Masefield was a poet of great power, later becoming Poet-Laureate, and set to use all of his skills in describing the feats and achievements of the expedition.Published in London and New York simultaneously to wide acclaim this account is a still a classic described by one critic as 'a book to strike the critical faculty numb' and 'too sacred for applause'-- W.H. Hamilton.This edition contains the numerous maps and illustrations that enrich and aid the readers experience.Author -- Masefield, John, 1878-1967.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, The Macmillan company, 1916.Original Page Count - 245 pages.Illustrations -- 9 maps and Illustrations

Ludendorff's Own Story, August 1914-November 1918 The Great War - Vol. II: from the siege of Liège to the signing of the armistice as viewed from the Grand headquarters of the German army

by Anon Anon General Erich Friedrich Wilhelm Ludendorff

As the German army moved swiftly into its start positions at the beginning of the First World War, efficiently and seamlessly forming up for the hammer blow that was to fall on France it must have been with some pride that General Ludendorff would look upon the first grand strategical plan that he had a hand in. A cool, calculating planner dedicated to ensuring that chance played as little a part in war as possible General Erich Ludendorff was the product of the prestigious German Kriegsakademie. His memoirs on the First World War are an excellently detailed account of the planning and execution of the ambitious German High command and their thirst for VictoryAlthough known primarily as staff officer his initial service, in the German army, during the war, was at the siege of Liège for which he was awarded the coveted Pour La Mérite by the Kaiser himself. He was rushed to the embattled Eastern Front as Chief of Staff to General von Hindenburg, and the two made an impressive team winning that battles of Tanneburg and the Masurian Lakes. Once again Ludendorff, this time was his chief Hindenburg, was drafted in as a replacement to ensure the fortunes of the German forces, this time on the Western front in 1916. He operated as the prime mover in the German empire from this point until the end of the war; masterminding the 1918 offensives as the last throw of the dice before capitulation.This second volume covers from 1917 until the end of the War and is enriched with maps of the campaigns of the First World War.Author -- General Ludendorff, Erich Friedrich Wilhelm, 1865-1937.Translator -- Anon.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York and London, Harper & Brothers, 1919.Original Page Count - 473 pages

Ludendorff's Own Story, August 1914-November 1918 The Great War - Vol. I: from the siege of Liège to the signing of the armistice as viewed from the Grand headquarters of the German army

by Anon Anon General Erich Friedrich Wilhelm Ludendorff

As the German army moved swiftly into its start positions at the beginning of the First World War, efficiently and seamlessly forming up for the hammer blow that was to fall on France it must have been with some pride that General Ludendorff would look upon the first grand strategical plan that he had a hand in. A cool, calculating planner dedicated to ensuring that chance played as little a part in war as possible General Erich Ludendorff was the product of the prestigious German Kriegsakademie. His memoirs on the First World War are an excellently detailed account of the planning and execution of the ambitious German High command and their thirst for VictoryAlthough known primarily as staff officer his initial service, in the German army, during the war, was at the siege of Liège for which he was awarded the coveted Pour La Mérite by the Kaiser himself. He was rushed to the embattled Eastern Front as Chief of Staff to General von Hindenburg, and the two made an impressive team winning that battles of Tanneburg and the Masurian Lakes. Once again Ludendorff, this time was his chief Hindenburg, was drafted in as a replacement to ensure the fortunes of the German forces, this time on the Western front in 1916. He operated as the prime mover in the German empire from this point until the end of the war; masterminding the 1918 offensives as the last throw of the dice before capitulation.This first volume covers his early career until 1917 and is enriched with maps of the campaigns of the First World War.Author -- General Erich Friedrich Wilhelm Ludendorff, 1865-1937.Translator -- Anon.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York and London, Harper & Brothers, 1919.Original Page Count - 477 pages

Canada's Hundred Days; With The Canadian Corps From Amiens To Mons, Aug. 8-Nov. 11, 1918.

by John Frederick Bligh Livesay

The Allied forces on the Western Front had taken a beating under the weight and new tactics of the German army masterminded by General Ludendorff in 1918. However in August the Allies were ready to fight back, and they did so with a vengeance; spearheaded by the Canadian and Australian corps and 500 tanks the allied forces hammered through the German lines. Ludendorff dubbed it as "the Black Day of the German Army". This was the start of the Battle of Amiens and would be the prelude to advances undreamed of by the Allies in earlier years of the war.The Canadian Corps had long established a reputation as a crack formation within the Allied armies and set to their task of rolling up the German lines with a passion. For the next hundred days the allied forces would surge forward and finally force the German forces to final capitulation.As a noted Canadian Author John Livesay set out to record the achievements of his countrymen during the culminating campaign of the First World War. He recounts with élan and excellent detail; the dash and perseverance of the Canadians in forcing the Germans from one position to the next.Author --John Frederick Bligh Livesay 1875-1944.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in Toronto, T. Allen, 1919.Original Page Count - x and 421 pages.

Voyage Of The Deutschland, The First Merchant Submarine

by Kapitänleutnant Paul König

The arrival of the submarine Deutschland in the harbour of New York in July of 1916 produced one of the sensation of the year. How had a U-Boat sailed all the way from Germany to the United States evading all of the counter-measures of the might Royal Navy and the even the U.S. coastal defences? The captain of the Deutschland, Paul König, was feted as a national hero in Germany and was lauded by those of German extraction in New York.He wrote this memoir of his famed journey from the inland waters of Germany all the way to the United States, it is filled with the dangers of the nascent submarine, in particular the fumes and heat of the diving compartment. Notable also the U-Boat had come as a merchantman, meaning that König was unarmed for combat and could only rely on deception to fulfill his mission to outwit his enemies.Author -- Kapitänleutnant Paul König (1867-1933)Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, Hearst's international library co., 1916.Original Page Count - xii and 247 pages.

With The Immortal Seventh Division

by Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Winchester Rev Edmund John Kennedy

Even among the highly-trained and professional soldiers of the B.E.F in 1914 the men of the Seventh division stood apart for their bearing and training, for the contained no reservists; all were full-time soldiers. Accompanying these uncompromising men, was Reverend Kennedy, assigned to the 20th Brigade, which was to see much action during the opening months of the First World War.The Padré and his beloved soldiers trekked into Belgium to take part in the First Battle of Ypres, to find the local inhabitants welcoming but the atmosphere filled with apprehension. As the Seventh finally clashed with the invading Germans the author found his role turned from an observer to participant in offering comfort and even absolution to the wounded and dying. A man of committed faith he continued to minster to his men as they fought in the desperate action around Ypres.After a year with the troops the Reverend returned to England and composed his memoirs of the period but did not survive long enough to see their publication.Author -- Rev. Edmund John Kennedy d. 1915.Preface -- Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Winchester.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, Hodder and Stoughton, 1916.Original Page Count - x and 193 pages

Facing The Hindenburg Line; Personal Observations At The Fronts: and in the camps of the British, French, Americans, and Italians, during the campaigns of 1917

by Burris Jenkins

Burris A. Jenkins served in the double capacity of a war correspondent and a lecturer in the Y.M.C.A, he was sent to the European War in 1916/17. He travelled through many of the camps and rear-zones of the First World War, noting down anecdotes and sketches of the soldiers that he met; from the dashing French Chasseurs, to the stolid but humorous Tommies. He wrote of his experiences among the soldiers and the sights of the warzones on his return to the United States, part of the campaign to publicize the Allies sacrifices and gain support for the American entry into the War. Author -- Jenkins, Burris A., 1869-1945.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, F.H. Revell Co., 1917Original Page Count - 256 pages

Prisoner Of The U-90

by Edouard Victor Michel Izac

Of the many weapons in the German arsenal during the First World War amongst the most effective were the silent undersea craft of the Kreigsmarine. The U-Boats prowled the oceans looking for prey, after the Kaiser removed all restrictions on the U-Boat captains in 1916 they could sink indiscriminately. As the troops of the United States pored over the Atlantic after the declaration of War in 1917 the U-Boats beneath the waves would have fresh targets. As the U.S.S. President Lincoln, a converted troop transport, returned to the United States, having set her cargo of soldiers on to French soil, she was suddenly torpedoed by the U-90. As the ship slowly sank a handful of her naval personnel were picked up by the submarine. Among them was Lieutenant Izac, who would earn the Congressional Medal of Honor for his successful escape from the clutches of his German captors.Author --Edouard Victor Michel Izac.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in Boston, Houghton, Mifflin company, 1919.Original Page Count - vii and 184 pages.Illustrations -- 2 plans

On Three Battle Fronts, By Private Fred Howard, Of The Australian And Canadian Forces

by Frederick Thomas Rowland Howard

There are many tales of soldiers fighting under the colours of an adopted nation; few stories are as fantastic as that of the Australian Frederick Howard. A keen sportsman and adept at the ways of the Australian "bush" the coming of the First World War gave him a jolt out of a meandering existence. With his twin and also his younger brother he sailed with his fellow Anzacs to the training in the Egyptian desert and then on to the hellish Gallipoli Peninsula. He was invalided home following wounds in Gallipoli, this did not faze the author who travelled all the way to Canada to enlist once again, This time finding himself in the 11th Canadian mounted rifles and under the adopted Maple Leaf he faced the Germans on the Somme in 1916 and at the success at Vimy Ridge before his indomitable military career was cut short by wounds sustained from a German shell.Despite recounting the danger as the shells and bullets whizzed and exploded around him, he relates anecdotes of his comrades and all of the wit and humour of an Australian; such as referring as his spell in hospital as time in a health resort!Highly recommended memoir.Author -- Frederick Thomas Rowland HowardText taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, Vechten Waring company, 1918.Original Page Count - 177 pages

Out Of My Life, By Marshal Von Hindenburg. Vol. II

by F. A. Holt Field-Marshal Paul von Hindenburg

Field-Marshal Paul von Hindenburg is a well-known figure to world history; the supreme war-lord of Germany for many years of the First World War and conservative figure-head of the post-war Germany. Although not of noble birth he rose through the ranks of the pre-war Prussian army, seeing much service in the Prussian-Austrian war of 1866 and the Franco-Prussian war of 1870. He believed his career over and retired in 1913 before being reactivated for the conflict that would become the First World War. He was assigned to the Eastern Front to combat the Russian armies. Forging a successful partnership with his staff officers, such as Max Hoffmann and Erich Ludendorff who dealt with much of the operational planning, he won the epic victories over the Russians at the battles of Tannenberg and the Masurian Lakes. Feted as a national hero after these victories and further successes in 1915, he was summoned to take charge on the Western front in 1916. He would mastermind the defensive strategy of the German army in 1916 and 1917 before committing the Germany army to the last throw of the dice in the 1918 German offensive.His memoirs are essential reading for anyone interested in the motivations of the German High command during the First World War. This second volume carries on his narrative from assumption of the quasi-dictatorship up to the end of the war.Author -- Field-Marshal von Hindenburg, Paul, 1847-1934.Translator -- F. A. Holt.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, Harper & brothers 1921Original Page Count - 296 pages.Illustrations -- 1 Portrait

Out Of My Life, By Marshal Von Hindenburg. Vol. I

by F. A. Holt Field-Marshal Paul von Hindenburg

Field-Marshal Paul von Hindenburg is a well-known figure to world history; the supreme war-lord of Germany for many years of the First World War and conservative figure-head of the post-war Germany. Although not of noble birth he rose through the ranks of the pre-war Prussian army, seeing much service in the Prussian-Austrian war of 1866 and the Franco-Prussian war of 1870. He believed his career over and retired in 1913 before being reactivated for the conflict that would become the First World War. He was assigned to the Eastern Front to combat the Russian armies. Forging a successful partnership with his staff officers, such as Max Hoffmann and Erich Ludendorff who dealt with much of the operational planning, he won the epic victories over the Russians at the battles of Tannenberg and the Masurian Lakes. Feted as a national hero after these victories and further successes in 1915, he was summoned to take charge on the Western front in 1916. He would mastermind the defensive strategy of the German army in 1916 and 1917 before committing the Germany army to the last throw of the dice in the 1918 German offensive.His memoirs are essential reading for anyone interested in the motivations of the German High command during the First World War. This first volume begins with his early military career up to his assumption of the post of the Chief of the General Staff in 1918.Author -- Field-Marshal von Hindenburg, Paul, 1847-1934.Translator -- F. A. Holt.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, Harper & brothers 1921Original Page Count - 267 pages.Illustrations -- 1 Portrait

A Scholar’s Letters From The Front

by F. F. Urquhart Stephen H. Hewett

It is the oft-told tale of the First World War that there was a "Missing Generation" of men that gave their lives from Galipolli to the Somme, that never fulfilled their hopes and their dreams have fallen beneath the horrors of the battlefield. Lieutenant Stephen Hewett is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial in Flanders, silent and obedient to the duty to his country. His memorial is also to be found in his letters home that he wrote to his family and friends from the training ground, France and Belgium; surprisingly upbeat and even jolly in tone given the hardships and dangers he faced they make for a fascinating read.Author -- Stephen H. Hewett. D. 1916.Introduction -- F. F. Urquhart.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, Longmans, Green and Co. 1918.Original Page Count - 114 pages.

The First Seven Divisions, Being A Detailed Account Of The Fighting From Mons To Ypres. [Illustrated Edition]

by Captain Lord Ernest William Hamilton

The opening of the First World War pitted the huge continental armies against each other; massed conscription filled their ranks, Britain's soldiers, however, were to a man volunteer, long-service professionals. Disciplined, few in number but thoroughly trained to shoot 15 aimed shoots in a "mad-minute", they were but few in number. The German forces they faced on the Western Front were counted by the number of their armies, the British forces could only put seven divisions in the field initially.In the face of overwhelming numbers the British soldiers gave a good account of themselves and held up the German advance during the crucial opening phases of the campaign alongside their French allies. The German High command had not counted on such stubborn resistance such a spanner in the works were they and their fighting prowess that the Kaiser himself paid the brave few the ultimate compliment-- "It is my Royal and Imperial command that you concentrate your energies, for the immediate present, upon one single purpose, and that is that you address all your skill and all the valour of my soldiers to exterminate first the treacherous English and walk over General French's contemptible little army."--Kaiser Wilhelm 19th August 1914.Written by Lord Hamilton, at the time a Captain in the 11th Hussars, this is an excellent and highly detailed account of the early months of the First World War on the British Front.Author -- Captain Lord Ernest William Hamilton (1858-1939)Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, E.P. Dutton and company 1916Original Page Count - 338 pages.Maps -- 8 detailed maps.

"En L'air!" (In The Air) Three Years On And Above Three Fronts [Illustrated Edition]

by Segeant Bert Hall

Sergeant Bert Hall belonged to an elite brotherhood; he was a founded member of the Lafayette Escadrille which fought in the colours of France during the First World War. Highly decorated individually and as a unit; Hall flew alongside the first American aviators such as Kiffin Rockwell, John Thaw, Victor Chapman and Raoul Lufbery.His first autobiography is gritty and adventure filled; recording his time spent in the French Foreign Legion and in the Trenches before his transfer to flying duties with the Lafayette squadron.Author -- Sergeant Hall, Bert, 1886-1948.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, N.Y., The new library, inc. 1918Original Page Count - 153 pages.Illustrations -- 10 Illustrations.

Sir Douglas Haig's Despatches (December 1915-April 1919) [Illustrated]

by Field-Marshal Earl Douglas Haig

Field-Marshal Haig commanded the British Empire forces through from 1915 to 1919; his period in charge of the men under his command has been the subject of much debate ever since the First World War ended. To some he was a "Butcher" overseeing the bloodbaths of the Somme and Passchendaele, to others he was a stoic leader faced with almost insurmountable difficulties of the warfare of the age. Whichever opinion holds sway in the public psyche, his despatches from the front, are gripping reading that drive to the heart of his character. Often fulsome of praise for the men under his command, Haig was reticent to give vent to failures in public; the despatches are very revelaing, whilst capturing all of the swings of fortune on the Western Front.Author -- Field-Marshal Earl Haig, Douglas, 1861-1928.Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in London, J.M. Dent & sons ltd.; 1919.Original Page Count - xvii and 378 pagesIllustrations -- 10 maps and Illustrations.

Guymeyer — The Ace Of Aces. [Illustrated Edition]

by Jacques Mortane Clifton Harby Levy

The title of "Ace" in the air war above France in the First World War was the coveted dream of all the daring flyers of the French, German British, and other armies. It was not an easily won honour, in order to be so recognized the airman would have to down five of the enemy aircraft, these experts of the air war would become the most lethal exponents of the airwar. However should the pilot achieve this rare feat he could become a national hero, feted by his comrades, respected and feared by his opponents. Even among these elite sky warriors there are a handful of men that stand out, German's Red Baron, von Richtofen, Canada's Billy Bishop, Britain's Albert Ball; but to all France Georges Guynemer was their idol and lionized as a national hero. With his 53 victories he stands in the first rank of the fighter aces of the First World War.One of France's foremost aeronautical authors Jacques Mortane undertook to write the biography of this legend, recording his famous victories and exploits with the Stork squadron and seeking to shed light on the shy national hero. Author -- Mortane, Jacques, 1883-1939.Translator -- Levy, Clifton Harby, 1867-Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in New York, Moffat, Yard & Company, 1918.Original Page Count - xxxii and 267 pages.Illustrations -- 12 illustrations.

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