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The Thumb on the Scale or the Supermarket Shell Game

by A. Q. Mowbray

This book presents a detailed and devastating exposure of supermarket packaging abuses and the business pressures, chicanery, and double talk which have produced and maintained them.

Storytelling in Religious Education

by Susan M. Shaw

Part I. Foundations of storytelling in religious education Part II. Types of story in religious education Part III. Development and storytelling

Principles and Practice of Psychopharmacotherapy

by Philip G. Janicak Stephen R. Marder Mani N. Pavuluri

Fully updated for its Fifth Edition, Principles and Practice of Psychopharmacotherapy summarizes the latest data on hundreds of drug and device-based therapies and offers practical, evidence-based guidelines and treatment strategies for virtually every psychiatric disorder. Highlights of this edition include expanded coverage of pharmacogenomics, updates on treatments for elderly patients, and discussion of mechanisms of action for drugs used in sleep disorders, especially narcolepsy.

The Miniature Guide to Critical Thinking: Concepts and Tools

by Richard Paul Linda Elder

This miniature guide focuses on of the essence of critical thinking concepts and tools distilled into a short book.

A Last Kiss for Mummy: A Teenage Mum, A Tiny Infant, A Terrible Choice

by Casey Watson

At fourteen, Emma is just a child herself - and one who's never been properly mothered. She has been in foster care several times already and when she discovered she was pregnant, and refused to have an abortion, her mother threw her out of the house. Casey and her family instantly form a strong bond with Emma's baby Roman, but dealing with Emma's behaviour and constant lack of responsibility is a far tougher challenge. And before long Casey finds she's doing something she never thought she would - covering up for Emma's shortcomings as she allows her personal involvement to colour her judgement. But the more Casey gets to know Emma the more she's convinced that with the right help and guidance this lonely and unsupported girl can become a good mother to her gorgeous little boy. That's what makes it even harder when Casey and her family have to make a stark choice: to hold on to Emma or look after Roman; to help a teenage girl desperate to turn her life around, or offer an innocent baby a safe home and much-needed good start in life.

The Transfiguration of the Commonplace: A Philosophy of Art

by Arthur C. Danto

Mr. Danto argues that recent developments in the artworld, in particular the production of works of art that cannot be told from ordinary things, make urgent the need for a new theory of art and make plain the factors such a theory can and cannot involve. In the course of constructing such a theory, he seeks to demonstrate the relationship between philosophy and art, as well as the connections that hold between art and social institutions and art history.

A Guide to Vocational Assessment 5th Edition

by Paul W. Power

This fifth edition of A Guide to Vocational Assessment acknowledges the changes in social and economic systems facing adults with disabilities. It suggests multiple evaluation approaches and insights that can be used to change the difficult to the possible and eventually to the probable. While many chapters underscore the use of traditional evaluation approaches, other chapters operationalize vocational assessment as an individualized, creative, empowering, holistic process and experience of self-discovery.

The Autobiography Of Malcolm X

by Alex Haley Malcolm X M. S. Handler

In the searing pages of this classic autobiography, originally published in 1964, Malcolm X, the Muslim leader, firebrand, and anti-integrationist, tells the extraordinary story of his life and the growth of the Black Muslim movement to veteran writer and journalist Alex Haley . In a unique collaboration, Haley worked with Malcolm X for nearly two years, interviewing, listening to, and understanding the most controversial leader of his time. Raised in Lansing, Michigan, Malcolm Little journeyed on a road to fame as astonishing as it was unpredictable. Drifting from childhood poverty to petty crime, Malcolm found himself in jail. It was there that he came into contact with the teachings of a little-known Black Muslim leader renamed Elijah Muhammad. The newly renamed Malcolm X devoted himself body and soul to the teachings of Elijah Muhammad and the world of Islam, becoming the Nation's foremost spokesman. When his conscience forced him to break with Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm founded the Organization of Afro-American Unity to reach African Americans across the country with an inspiring message of pride, power, and self-determination. The Autobiography of Malcolm X defines American culture and the African American struggle for social and economic equality that has now become a battle for survival. Malcolm's fascinating perspective on the lies and limitations of the American Dream, and the inherent racism in a society that denies its nonwhite citizens the opportunity to dream, gives extraordinary insight into the most urgent issues of our own time. The Autobiography of Malcolm X stands as the definitive statement of a movement and a man whose work was never completed but whose message is timeless.

Everything Will Be Alright

by Shubhanku Kochar

This book is a saga of love and survival. Nihal and Bhoomi leave their houses for fulfilling certain mission. In their journey towards fulfilment they are guided by unseen forces.

Spelling Connections, [Grade] 6

by J. Richard Gentry

NIMAC-sourced textbook

Foundations of Astronomy

by Michael A. Seeds Dana E. Backman

Fascinating, engaging, and extremely visual, FOUNDATIONS OF ASTRONOMY, Thirteenth Edition, is renowned for its current coverage, reader-friendly presentation, and detailed, yet clear explanations. The authors' goals are to help you use astronomy to understand science--and use science to answer two fundamental questions: What are we? And how do we know?

Innovation, Diversity, and the SBIR/STTR Programs: Summary of a Workshop

by Sujai J. Shivakumar

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs provide federal research and development funding to small businesses. One of the the goals of these programs is to foster and encourage participation by minority and disadvantaged persons in technological innovation. "Innovation, Diversity, and Success in the SBIR/STTR Programs" is the summary of a workshop convened in February 2013 that focused on the participation of women, minorities, and both older and younger scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs in the SBIR and STTR programs, with the goal of reviewing current efforts to expand the pool of SBIR/STTR-funded researchers and of identifying mechanisms for improving participation rates. This report is a record of the presentation and discussions of the event.

Mesoscale Chemistry: A Workshop Report

by Kathryn Hughes

In the last few decades great strides have been made in chemistry at the nanoscale, where the atomic granularity of matter and the exact positions of individual atoms are key determinants of structure and dynamics. Less attention, however, has been paid to the mesoscale - it is at this scale, in the range extending from large molecules (10 nm) through viruses to eukaryotic cells (10 microns), where interesting ensemble effects and the functionality that is critical to macroscopic phenomenon begins to manifest itself and cannot be described by laws on the scale of atoms and molecules alone. To further explore how knowledge about mesoscale phenomena can impact chemical research and development activities and vice versa, the Chemical Sciences Roundtable of the National Research Council convened a workshop on mesoscale chemistry in November 2014. With a focus on the research on chemical phenomena at the mesoscale, participants examined the opportunities that utilizing those behaviors can have for developing new catalysts, adding new functionality to materials, and increasing our understanding of biological and interfacial systems. The workshop also highlighted some of the challenges for analysis and description of mesoscale structures. This report summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

Tying Flood Insurance to Flood Risk for Low-Lying Structures in the Floodplain

by Committee on Risk-Based Methods for Insurance Premiums of Negatively Elevated Structures in the National Flood Insurance Program

Floods take a heavy toll on society, costing lives, damaging buildings and property, disrupting livelihoods, and sometimes necessitating federal disaster relief, which has risen to record levels in recent years. The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) was created in 1968 to reduce the flood risk to individuals and their reliance on federal disaster relief by making federal flood insurance available to residents and businesses if their community adopted floodplain management ordinances and minimum standards for new construction in flood prone areas. Insurance rates for structures built after a flood plain map was adopted by the community were intended to reflect the actual risk of flooding, taking into account the likelihood of inundation, the elevation of the structure, and the relationship of inundation to damage to the structure. Today, rates are subsidized for one-fifth of the NFIP's 5. 5 million policies. Most of these structures are negatively elevated, that is, the elevation of the lowest floor is lower than the NFIP construction standard. Compared to structures built above the base flood elevation, negatively elevated structures are more likely to incur a loss because they are inundated more frequently, and the depths and durations of inundation are greater. Tying Flood Insurance to Flood Risk for Low-Lying Structures in the Floodplain studies the pricing of negatively elevated structures in the NFIP. This report review current NFIP methods for calculating risk-based premiums for these structures, including risk analysis, flood maps, and engineering data. The report then evaluates alternative approaches for calculating risk-based premiums and discusses engineering hydrologic and property assessment data needs to implement full risk-based premiums. The findings and conclusions of this report will help to improve the accuracy and precision of loss estimates for negatively elevated structures, which in turn will increase the credibility, fairness, and transparency of premiums for policyholders.

Health Literacy: Past, Present, and Future: Workshop Summary

by Joe Alper

In 2004, the Institute of Medicine released "Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion," a report on the then-underappreciated challenge of enabling patients to comprehend their condition and treatment, to make the best decisions for their care, and to take the right medications at the right time in the intended dose. That report documented the problems, origins, and consequences of the fact that tens of millions of U. S. adults are unable to read complex texts, including many health-related materials, and it proposed possible solutions to those problems. To commemorate the anniversary of the release of the 2004 health literacy report, the Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Health Literacy convened a 1-day public workshop to assess the progress made in the field of health literacy over the past decade, the current state of the field, and the future of health literacy at the local, national, and international levels. "Health Literacy: Past, Present, and Future" summarizes the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

Maternal-Child Nursing Care with Women's Health Companion 2e: Optimizing Outcomes For Mothers, Children, And Families

by Shelton M. Hisley Susan L. Ward

'Think like a nurse' with the 2nd Edition of this AJN Book-of-the-Year Award winner. It offers the perfect balance of maternal and child nursing care with the right depth and breadth of coverage for students in today's maternity/pediatric courses. And, it's accompanied byThe Women's Health Companion, a complete guide to the role of the nurse in promoting women's health. A unique emphasis on optimizing outcomes, evidence-based practice, and research supports the goal of caring for women, families and children, not only in traditional hospital settings, but also wherever they live, work, study, or play. Clear, concise, and easy to follow, the content is organized around four major themes, holistic care, critical thinking, validating practice, and tools for care that help students to learn and apply the material. Don't miss the Plus Code, inside new, printed texts. It unlocks the resources online at DavisPlus, including Davis Digital Version, your complete text online, and an Electronic Study Guide with learning tools and clinical resources. Click here to see an overview of everything this resource has to offer. What instructors are saying. . . "Well written, eye-catching and well organized chapters"- Sami Rahman, MEd, MSN, RNBlinn College "Clear, concise, uses tables and figures to support important concepts and content. "- Darlene A. Ardary, PhD, RN, CPN, CSNLock Haven University "It is thorough on content and it contains many student tools like charts, tables and concept maps. "- Carmen Torres MSN, MHS, RN, CNEBergen Community College "I like the different aspects that are included that get the students engaged in learning. It is a comprehensive text to use when teaching Maternal child nursing. It is simple enough for all students but engaging enough to keep even your most adept student challenged. "- Teresa Carnevale, PhD, MSN, RNBeaver College of Health Sciences "A complete continuum of the child from preconception through adolescents. All inclusive in a easy to read and understandable format. " - Stephanie Palmersheim MSN, RNSt. Luke's CollegeSioux City, Iowa "Good flow with information and material from Care of Maternal Health Nursing to Care of Pediatric Nursing. " - Lisa Stoddart, MSN, RN, FNP-BC Associate Nursing Professor Pediatrics San Joaquin Delta College

Law for Business

by John E. Adamson Edward J. Conry Norbert J. Mietus

This text effectively teaches an understanding of legal obligations and rights in business, and how to avoid legal difficulties. Law For Business effectively covers areas such as computer law, financial crimes, legal careers, environmental law, international law, and more.

Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series

by Megan Reeve

When disaster strikes, it rarely impacts just one jurisdiction. Many catastrophic disaster plans include support from neighboring jurisdictions that likely will not be available in a regional disaster. Bringing multiple stakeholders together from sectors that do not routinely work with each other can augment a response to a disaster, but can also be extremely difficult because of the multi-disciplinary communication and coordination needed to ensure effective medical and public health response. As many communities within a region will have similar vulnerabilities, a logical step in planning is to establish responsibilities and capacities, and be able to work toward common goals to address all-hazards when the entire region is affected. To explore these considerations, the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events organized a series of three regional workshops in 2014 to explore opportunities to strengthen the regional coordination required in response to a large scale multijurisdictional disaster. The purpose of each regional workshop was to discuss ways to strengthen coordination among multiple jurisdictions in various regions to ensure fair and equitable treatment of communities from all impacted areas. "Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes" summarizes the presentation and discussion of these workshops.

Affordability of National Flood Insurance Program Premiums: Report 1

by Committee on the Affordability of National Flood Insurance Program Premiums

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is housed within the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and offers insurance policies that are marketed and sold through private insurers, but with the risks borne by the U. S. federal government. NFIP's primary goals are to ensure affordable insurance premiums, secure widespread community participation in the program, and earn premium and fee income that covers claims paid and program expenses over time. In July 2012, the U. S. Congress passed the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform and Modernization Act (Biggert-Waters 2012), designed to move toward an insurance program with NFIP risk-based premiums that better reflected expected losses from floods at insured properties. This eliminated policies priced at what the NFIP called "pre-FIRM subsidized" and "grandfathered. " As Biggert-Waters 2012 went into effect, constituents from multiple communities expressed concerns about the elimination of lower rate classes, arguing that it created a financial burden on policy holders. In response to these concerns Congress passed The Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2014 (HFIAA 2014). The 2014 legislation changed the process by which pre-FIRM subsidized premiums for primary residences would be removed and reinstated grandfathering. As part of that legislation, FEMA must report back to Congress with a draft affordability framework. "Affordability of National Flood Insurance Program Premiums: Report 1" is the first part of a two-part study to provide input as FEMA prepares their draft affordability framework. This report discusses the underlying definitions and methods for an affordability framework and the affordability concept and applications. "Affordability of National Flood Insurance Program Premiums" gives an overview of the demand for insurance and the history of the NFIP premium setting. The report then describes alternatives for determining when the premium increases resulting from Biggert-Waters 2012 would make flood insurance unaffordable.

The Future of Home Health Care: Workshop Summary

by Victoria Weisfeld

Individuals with disabilities, chronic conditions, and functional impairments need a range of services and supports to keep living independently. However, there often is not a strong link between medical care provided in the home and the necessary social services and supports for independent living. Home health agencies and others are rising to the challenges of meeting the needs and demands of these populations to stay at home by exploring alternative models of care and payment approaches, the best use of their workforces, and technologies that can enhance independent living. All of these challenges and opportunities lead to the consideration of how home health care fits into the future health care system overall. On September 30 and October 1, 2014, the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council convened a public workshop on the future of home health care. The workshop brought together a spectrum of public and private stakeholders and thought leaders to improve understanding of the current role of Medicare home health care in supporting aging in place and in helping high-risk, chronically ill, and disabled Americans receive health care in their communities. Through presentations and discussion, participants explored the evolving role of Medicare home health care in caring for Americans in the future, including how to integrate Medicare home health care into new models for the delivery of care and the future health care marketplace. The workshop also considered the key policy reforms and investments in workforces, technologies, and research needed to leverage the value of home health care to support older Americans, and research priorities that can help clarify the value of home health care. This summary captures important points raised by the individual speakers and workshop participants.

Innovations in Design and Utilization of Measurement Systems to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary

by Steve Olson

Many measurement systems to monitor the well-being of children and guide services are implemented across the community, state, and national levels in the United States. While great progress has been made in recent years in developing interventions that have been shown to improve the cognitive, affective, and behavioral health of children, many of these tested and effective interventions have yet to be widely implemented. One potential reason for this lag in implementation is a need to further develop and better utilize measures that gauge the success of evidence-based programs as part of a broad effort to prevent negative outcomes and foster children's health and well-being. To address this issue, the Institute of Medicine Forum on Promoting Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health held a workshop in Washington, DC, on November 5-6, 2014. The workshop featured presentations on the use of data linkage and integration to inform research and practice related to children's cognitive, affective, and behavioral health; the use of quality measures to facilitate system change in health care, classroom, and juvenile justice settings; and tools developed to measure implementation of evidence-based prevention programs at scale to support sustainable program delivery, among other topics. Workshop presenters and participants discussed examples of innovative design and utilization of measurement systems, new approaches to build on existing data systems, and new data systems that could support the cognitive, affective, and behavioral health and well-being of children. This report summarizes the presentation and discussions of the event.

Transforming Health Care Scheduling and Access: Getting to Now

by Gary Kaplan

According to "Transforming Health Care Scheduling and Access," long waits for treatment are a function of the disjointed manner in which most health systems have evolved to accommodate the needs and the desires of doctors and administrators, rather than those of patients. The result is a health care system that deploys its most valuable resource - highly trained personnel - inefficiently, leading to an unnecessary imbalance between the demand for appointments and the supply of open appointments. This study makes the case that by using the techniques of systems engineering, new approaches to management, and increased patient and family involvement, the current health care system can move forward to one with greater focus on the preferences of patients to provide convenient, efficient, and excellent health care without the need for costly investment. "Transforming Health Care Scheduling and Access" identifies best practices for making significant improvements in access and system-level change. This report makes recommendations for principles and practices to improve access by promoting efficient scheduling. This study will be a valuable resource for practitioners to progress toward a more patient-focused "How can we help you today?" culture.

Vital Signs: Core Metrics for Health and Health Care Progress

by David Blumenthal

Thousands of measures are in use today to assess health and health care in the United States. <P><P>Although many of these measures provide useful information, their usefulness in either gauging or guiding performance improvement in health and health care is seriously limited by their sheer number, as well as their lack of consistency, compatibility, reliability, focus, and organization. To achieve better health at lower cost, all stakeholders - including health professionals, payers, policy makers, and members of the public - must be alert to what matters most. What are the core measures that will yield the clearest understanding and focus on better health and well-being for Americans? "Vital Signs" explores the most important issues - healthier people, better quality care, affordable care, and engaged individuals and communities - and specifies a streamlined set of 15 core measures. These measures, if standardized and applied at national, state, local, and institutional levels across the country, will transform the effectiveness, efficiency, and burden of health measurement and help accelerate focus and progress on our highest health priorities. "Vital Signs" also describes the leadership and activities necessary to refine, apply, maintain, and revise the measures over time, as well as how they can improve the focus and utility of measures outside the core set. If health care is to become more effective and more efficient, sharper attention is required on the elements most important to health and health care. "Vital Signs" lays the groundwork for the adoption of core measures that, if systematically applied, will yield better health at a lower cost for all Americans.

Exploring Opportunities for Collaboration Between Health and Education to Improve Population Health: Workshop Summary

by Joe Alper

Research based on decades of experience in the developing world has identified educational status, especially the status of the mother, as a major predictor of health outcomes and that the literature indicates that the gradient in health outcomes by educational attainment has steepened over the last four decades across the United States. Since the 1990s, while the average life expectancy in the United States has been steadily increasing, life expectancy has actually decreased for people without a high school education, especially white women. To understand the complex relationship between education and health and how this understanding could inform our nation's investments and policies, the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Population Health Improvement held a public workshop in Washington, DC, on June 5, 2014. This workshop, which featured presentations and extensive discussion periods, also explored how the health and education sectors can work together more effectively to achieve improvements in both health status and educational achievement. This report summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop.

Showing 4,926 through 4,950 of 6,797 results


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