Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 76 through 100 of 4,237 results

How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America

by Kiese Laymon

Author and essayist Kiese Laymon is one of the most unique, stirring, and powerful new voices in American social and cultural commentary. How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America is a collection of Laymon's essays, touching on subjects ranging from family, race, violence, and celebrity to music, writing, and coming of age in the rural Mississippi Gulf Coast. Laymon's writing is unflinchingly honest, while also being smart, lacerating, and unexpectedly funny.In How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America, Laymon deals in depth with his own personal story, which is filled with trials (and reflections on those trials) that illuminate under-appreciated aspects of contemporary American life. As revealed in the book's title essay, Laymon attended three colleges before earning his undergraduate degree. He was suspended from the first of these institutions, Millsaps College, following a probationary period resulting from a controversial essay he published on campus. As the school's president described it, the "Key Essay in question was written by Kiese Laymon, a controversial writer who consistently editorializes on race issues." Controversy seemed to follow this young writer, but as he himself puts it, "my job is to ask questions, to broaden the scope of American literature by broadening the scope of who is written to and imaginatively writes back."Laymon voice is something new and unexpected in contemporary American writing, mixing a colloquial voice with acerbic wit, sharp insights, and blast-furnace heat that calls to mind no one so much as a black 21st-century Mark Twain. Much like Twain, Laymon's writing is steeped in controversial issues both private and public. From his biting critiques of race politics to revelations of his own internal struggles with American "blackness," Laymon taps into an ongoing conversation that is played out consciously and subconsciously across all of our artistic, cultural, political, and economic realities.This collection introduces Laymon as a writer who balances volatile concepts on a razor's edge, and who chops up much-discussed and often-misunderstood topics with his scathing humor and fresh, unexpected takes on the ongoing absurdities, frivolities, and calamities of American life.

Hot Doug's: The Book

by Kate Devivo Doug Sohn Graham Elliot

When it comes to hot dogs, Hot Doug's head chef Doug Sohn is the master of the craft. His introduction of gourmet ingredients and professionally trained culinary flair to the world of encased meats has earned him national recognition and praise. In Hot Doug's: The Book, Sohn takes the reader on a fun, irreverent trip through the history of hot dogs, his restaurant, and the many patrons -- both famous and average Joe -- who have declared Sohn the king of dogs.As told through Sohn's own stories, this book will combine photos, favorite anecdotes, lessons learned, and lists ranging from general restaurant etiquette to most-repeated sausage double-entendres (Doug's heard 'em all). Stories included will reveal fact from the folklore of the restaurant's founding, retell the tale of Hot Doug's infamous 2006 run-in with Chicago City Hall, and even provide accounts of Hot Doug's-inspired tattoos, which if presented upon order privilege the bearer to free hot dogs for life. Contributions from some of Hot Doug's biggest fans will be spread throughout the book, with raves from Paul Kahan, Steve Albini, Dan Sinker, Mindy Segal, Homaro Cantu, Aziz Ansari, many other local and national figures, and an introduction from Graham Elliot.

The Gluten-Free Good Health Cookbook

by Annalise G. Roberts Claudia Pillow

From Annalise Roberts, author of the celebrated Gluten-Free Baking Classics, and Claudia Pillow, PhD, comes this new full-scale gluten-free cookbook--a breakthrough in healthier eating, featuring 140 great new recipes. The Gluten-Free Good Health Cookbook is a true departure from other diet cookbooks--learn how you can make daily decisions that will strengthen your immune system, prevent disease, and help you lose weight by eating real food.The book includes compelling food choice explanations, guidance, and cooking advice, plus 140 field-tested recipes, including gluten-free roux for Macaroni and Cheese; traditional pan sauce gravies; innovative low-fat sauces and creamy soups; and a comprehensive chapter on the art and science of cooking great-tasting vegetables.Readers will enjoy a wide selection of flavorful and diverse recipes like Buffalo Meatballs, Roasted Poblano Asiago Soup, Kale with Puttanesca Sauce, Chicken Noodle Gratin, Moroccan Lamb Stew, and more.

Gluten-Free Baking Classics

by Annalise G. Roberts

This revised edition of Annalise Roberts' popular cookbook is a welcome choice for those allergic to gluten who want to enjoy delicious fresh-baked foods. Roberts presents easy-to-use recipes and techniques for baking everyday basics like bread and cookies as well as classic treats like brownies and biscuits. Sample delights include Multi-Grain Artisan Bread, Hazelnut Cake, and Old-Fashioned Buttermilk Doughnuts. These recipes use precise mixes of non-wheat-based, gluten-free flours that only the baker need know are allergy safe. Gluten-Free Baking Classics is designed for all skills levels, from beginner to seasoned, and the book is especially useful for novices since it contains detailed instructions on how to get started, as well as timeless baking techniques and guidelines to assure success. Also included are tips on how to incorporate gluten-free baking into a busy weekly schedule, and the book explains why baking wholesome and delicious breads, muffins, cakes, and other items is so important for emotional and physical well-being.

Mr. and Mrs. Doctor

by Julie Iromuanya

Ifi and Job, a Nigerian couple in an arranged marriage, begin their lives together in Nebraska with a single, outrageous lie: that Job is a doctor, not a college dropout. Unwittingly, Ifi becomes his co-conspirator--that is until his first wife, Cheryl, whom he married for a green card years ago, reenters the picture and upsets Job's tenuous balancing act. Julie Iromuanya has short stories and novel excerpts appearing or forthcoming in the Kenyon Review, Passages North, the Cream City Review, and the Tampa Review, among other journals. Mr. and Mrs. Doctor is her first novel.

The Deep Zoo

by Rikki Ducornet

Included in Library Journal's "25 Key Indie Fiction Titles, Fall 2014-Winter 2015"Within the writer's life, words and things acquire power. For Borges it is the tiger and the color red, for Cortázar a pair of amorous lions, and for an early Egyptian scribe the monarch butterfly that metamorphosed into the Key of Life. Ducornet names these powers The Deep Zoo. Her essays take us from the glorious bestiary of Aloys Zötl to Abu Ghraib, from the tree of life to Sade's Silling Castle, from The Epic of Gilgamesh to virtual reality. Says Ducornet, "To write with the irresistible ink of tigers and the uncaging of our own Deep Zoo, we need to be attentive and fearless-above all very curious-and all at the same time.""Ducornet's skill at drawing unexpected connections, and her ability to move between outrage and meditativeness, are gripping to behold."-Star Tribune"This collection of essays meditates on art, mysticism, and more; it'll leave a reader with plenty to ponder."-Vol. 1 Brooklyn"Rikki Ducornet's new collection The Deep Zoo is filled with smart and surprising essays that explore our connections to the world through art."-Largehearted Boy""The Deep Zoo" acts as a kind of foundational text, a lens to view her work and the other essays through. . . Subversive at heart and acutely perceptive."-Numero Cinq"Ducornet moves between these facets of human experience with otherworldly grace, creating surprising parallels and associations. . . The Deep Zoo is a testament to her acrobatic intelligence and unflinching curiosity. Ducornet not only trusts the subconscious, she celebrates and interrogates it."-The Heavy Feather"What struck me most about this collection, and what I am confident will pull me back to it again, is Ducornet's obvious passion for life. She is . . . attentive, fearless, and curious. And for a hundred pages we get to see how it feels to exist like that, what it's like to think critically and still be open to the world."-Cleaver Magazine"Rikki Ducornet is imagination's emissary to this mundane world."-Stephen Sparks, Green Apple Books on the Park"This book is like the secret at the heart of the world; I've put other books aside."-Anne GermanacosPraise for Rikki Ducornet"A novelist whose vocabulary sweats with a kind of lyrical heat."-The New York Times"Linguistically explosive . . . one of the most interesting American writers around."-The Nation"Ducornet-surrealist, absurdist, pure anarchist at times-is one of our most accomplished writers, adept at seizing on the perfect details and writing with emotion and cool detachment simultaneously."-Jeff Vandermeer"A unique combination of the practical and fabulous, a woman equally alive to the possibilities of joy and the necessity of political responsibility, a creature-à la Shakespeare's Cleopatra-of 'infinite variety,' Ducornet is a writer of extraordinary power, in whose books 'rigor and imagination' (her watchwords) perform with the grace and daring of high-wire acrobats."-Laura Mullen, BOMB Magazine"The perversity, decadence, and even the depravity that Ducornet renders here feel explosively fresh because their sources are thought and emotion, not the body, and finally there's some pathos too."-The Boston Globe"Ducornet's skill at drawing unexpected connections, and her ability to move between outrage and meditativeness, are gripping to behold."-Tobias Carroll, Star Tribune"This collection of essays meditates on art, mysticism, and more; it'll leave a reader with plenty to ponder."- Vol. 1 Brooklyn"Rikki Ducornet's new collection The Deep Zoo is filled with smart and surprising essays that explore our connections to the world through art."- Largehearted Boy

The Transparent Society

by David Brin

In New York and Baltimore, police cameras scan public areas twenty-four hours a day. Huge commercial databases track you finances and sell that information to anyone willing to pay. Host sites on the World Wide Web record every page you view, and "smart" toll roads know where you drive. Every day, new technology nibbles at our privacy.Does that make you nervous? David Brin is worried, but not just about privacy. He fears that society will overreact to these technologies by restricting the flow of information, frantically enforcing a reign of secrecy. Such measures, he warns, won't really preserve our privacy. Governments, the wealthy, criminals, and the techno-elite will still find ways to watch us. But we'll have fewer ways to watch them. We'll lose the key to a free society: accountability.The Transparent Society is a call for "reciprocal transparency." If police cameras watch us, shouldn't we be able to watch police stations? If credit bureaus sell our data, shouldn't we know who buys it? Rather than cling to an illusion of anonymity-a historical anomaly, given our origins in close-knit villages-we should focus on guarding the most important forms of privacy and preserving mutual accountability. The biggest threat to our freedom, Brin warns, is that surveillance technology will be used by too few people, now by too many.A society of glass houses may seem too fragile. Fearing technology-aided crime, governments seek to restrict online anonymity; fearing technology-aided tyranny, citizens call for encrypting all data. Brins shows how, contrary to both approaches, windows offer us much better protection than walls; after all, the strongest deterrent against snooping has always been the fear of being spotted. Furthermore, Brin argues, Western culture now encourages eccentricity-we're programmed to rebel! That gives our society a natural protection against error and wrong-doing, like a body's immune system. But "social T-cells" need openness to spot trouble and get the word out. The Transparent Society is full of such provocative and far-reaching analysis.The inescapable rush of technology is forcing us to make new choices about how we want to live. This daring book reminds us that an open society is more robust and flexible than one where secrecy reigns. In an era of gnat-sized cameras, universal databases, and clothes-penetrating radar, it will be more vital than ever for us to be able to watch the watchers. With reciprocal transparency we can detect dangers early and expose wrong-doers. We can gauge the credibility of pundits and politicians. We can share technological advances and news. But all of these benefits depend on the free, two-way flow of information.

Six Not-So-Easy Pieces

by Matthew Sands Robert B. Leighton Richard P. Feynman

Six lectures, all regarding the most revolutionary discovery in twentieth-century physics: Einstein's Theory of Relativity. No one--not even Einstein himself--explained these difficult, anti-intuitive concepts more clearly, or with more verve and gusto, than Feynman.

Bugs In The System

by May R. Berenbaum

An introduction to insect physiology, genetics and behaviour which looks at the interaction between humans and insects, and explores both the positive and negative aspects of the relationship.

Uncommon Grounds

by Mark Pendergrast

Uncommon Grounds tells the story of coffee from its discovery on a hill in ancient Abyssinia to the advent of Starbucks. In this updated edition of the classic work, Mark Pendergrast reviews the dramatic changes in coffee culture over the past decade, from the disastrous "Coffee Crisis" that caused global prices to plummet to the rise of the Fair Trade movement and the "third-wave" of quality-obsessed coffee connoisseurs. As the scope of coffee culture continues to expand, Uncommon Grounds remains more than ever a brilliantly entertaining guide to the currents of one of the world's favorite beverages.

Deadly Choices

by Paul A. Offit

There's a silent, dangerous war going on out there. On one side are parents, bombarded with stories about the dangers of vaccines, now wary of immunizing their sons and daughters. On the other side are doctors, scared to send kids out of their offices vulnerable to illnesses like whooping cough and measles--the diseases of their grandparents.How did anyone come to view vaccines with horror? The answer is rooted in one of the most powerful citizen activist movements in our nation's history. In Deadly Choices, infectious disease expert Paul Offit relates the shocking story of anti-vaccine America--its origins, leaders, influences, and impact. Offering strategies to keep us from returning to an era when children routinely died from infections, Deadly Choices is a vigorous and definitive rebuttal of the powerful anti-vaccine movement.

Empire

by Niall Ferguson

The British Empire was the largest in all history: the nearest thing to world domination ever achieved. By the eve of World War II, around a quarter of the world's land surface was under some form of British rule. Yet for today's generation, the British Empire seems a Victorian irrelevance. The time is ripe for a reappraisal, and in Empire, Niall Ferguson boldly recasts the British Empire as one of the world's greatest modernizing forces.An important new work of synthesis and revision, Empire argues that the world we know today is in large measure the product of Britain's Age of Empire. The spread of capitalism, the communications revolution, the notion of humanitarianism, and the institutions of parliamentary democracy-all these can be traced back to the extraordinary expansion of Britain's economy, population, and culture from the seventeenth century until the mid-twentieth. On a vast and vividly colored canvas, Empire shows how the British Empire acted as midwife to modernity.Displaying the originality and rigor that have made him the brightest light among British historians, Ferguson shows that the story of the Empire is pregnant with lessons for today-in particular for the United States as it stands on the brink of a new era of imperial power, based once again on economic and military supremacy. A dazzling tour de force, Empire is a remarkable reappraisal of the prizes and pitfalls of global empire.

Reinventing the Sacred

by Stuart A. Kauffman

Consider the complexity of a living cell after 3.8 billion years of evolution. Is it more awesome to suppose that a transcendent God fashioned the cell at a stroke, or to realize that it evolved with no Almighty Hand, but arose on its own in the changing biosphere?In this bold and fresh look at science and religion, complexity theorist Stuart Kauffman argues that the qualities of divinity that we revere-creativity, meaning, purposeful action-are properties of the universe that can be investigated methodically. He offers stunning evidence for this idea in an abundance of fields, from cell biology to the philosophy of mind, and uses it to find common ground between belief systems often at odds with one another.A daring and ambitious argument for a new understanding of natural divinity, Reinventing the Sacred challenges readers both scientifically and philosophically.

The Republican War on Science

by Chris Mooney

Science has never been more crucial to deciding the political issues facing the country. Yet science and scientists have less influence with the federal government than at any time since Richard Nixon fired his science advisors. In the White House and Congress today, findings are reported in a politicized manner; spun or distorted to fit the speaker's agenda; or, when they're too inconvenient, ignored entirely. On a broad array of issues-stem cell research, climate change, evolution, sex education, product safety, environmental regulation, and many others-the Bush administration's positions fly in the face of overwhelming scientific consensus. Federal science agencies-once fiercely independent under both Republican and Democratic presidents-are increasingly staffed by political appointees who know industry lobbyists and evangelical activists far better than they know the science. This is not unique to the Bush administration, but it is largely a Republican phenomenon, born of a conservative dislike of environmental, health, and safety regulation, and at the extremes, of evolution and legalized abortion. In The Republican War on Science, Chris Mooney ties together the disparate strands of the attack on science into a compelling and frightening account of our government's increasing unwillingness to distinguish between legitimate research and ideologically driven pseudoscience.

Crucible of Command

by William C. Davis

A dual biography and a fresh approach to the always compelling subject of these two iconic leaders-how they fashioned a distinctly American war, and a lasting peace, that fundamentally changed our nation

No Better Time

by Molly Knight Raskin

No Better Time tells of a young, driven mathematical genius who wrote a set of algorithms that would create a faster, better Internet. It's the story of a beautiful friendship between a loud, irreverent student and his soft-spoken MIT professor, of a husband and father who spent years struggling to make ends meet only to become a billionaire almost overnight with the success of Akamai Technologies, the Internet content delivery network he cofounded with his mentor.Danny Lewin's brilliant but brief life is largely unknown because, until now, those closest to him have guarded their memories and quietly mourned their loss. For Lewin was almost certainly the first victim of 9/11, stabbed to death at age 31 while trying to overpower the terrorists who would eventually fly American Flight 11 into the World Trade Center. But ironically it was 9/11 that proved the ultimate test for Lewin's vision--while phone communication failed and web traffic surged as never before, the critical news and government sites that relied on Akamai--and the technology pioneered by Danny Lewin--remained up and running.

The Birth of Politics: Eight Greek and Roman Political Ideas and Why They Matter

by Melissa Lane

In The Birth of Politics, Melissa Lane introduces the reader to the foundations of Western political thought, from the Greeks, who invented democracy, to the Romans, who created a republic and then transformed it into an empire. Tracing the origins of our political concepts from Socrates to Plutarch to Cicero, Lane reminds us that the birth of politics was a story as much of individuals as ideas. Scouring the speeches of lawyers alongside the speculations of philosophers, and the reflections of ex-slaves next to the popular comedies and tragedies of the Greek and Roman stages, this book brings ancient ideas to life in unexpected ways. Lane shows how the Greeks and Romans defined politics with distinctive concepts, vocabulary, and practices--all of which continue to influence politics and political aspirations around the world today. She focuses on eight political ideas from the Greco-Roman world that are especially influential today: justice, virtue, constitution, democracy, citizenship, cosmopolitanism, republic, and sovereignty. Lane also describes how the ancient formulations of these ideas often challenge widely held modern assumptions--for example, that it is possible to have political equality despite great economic inequality, or that political regimes can be indifferent to the moral character of their citizens. A stimulating introduction to the origins of our political ideas and ideals, The Birth of Politics demonstrates how much we still have to learn from the political genius of the Greeks and Romans.

Eastern Europe!

by Tomek E. Jankowski

When the legendary Romulus killed his brother Remus and founded the city of Rome in 753 BCE, Plovdiv -- today the second-largest city in Bulgaria -- was already thousands of years old. Indeed, London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Madrid, Brussels, Amsterdam are all are mere infants compared to Plovdiv. This is just one of the paradoxes that haunts and defines the New Europe, that part of Europe that was freed from Soviet bondage in 1989 which is at once both much older than the modern Atlantic-facing power centers of Western Europe while also being in some ways much younger than them. Eastern Europe! is a brief and concise (but informative) introduction to Eastern Europe and its myriad customs and history. Even those knowledgeable about Western Europe often see Eastern Europe as terra incognita, with a sign on the border declaring "Here be monsters." This book is a gateway to understanding both what unites and separates Eastern Europeans from their Western brethren, and how this vital region has been shaped by, but has also left its mark on, Western Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East and North Africa. Ideal for students, businesspeople, and those who simply want to know more about where Grandma or Grandpa came from, Eastern Europe! is a user-friendly guide to a region that is all too often mischaracterized as remote, insular, and superstitious.Illustrations throughout include: 40 photos, 40 maps and 40 figures (tables, charts, etc.)

Dreamweaver CS5 Digital Classroom

by Agi Creative Team Greg Heald Jeremy Osborn

Learning Dreamweaver is a dream with this instructional book-and-video training package!Dreamweaver CS5 Digital Classroom covers Dreamweaver CS5 and Dreamweaver CS5.5. Adobe Dreamweaver allows you to easily create robust Web sites without needing extensive programming knowledge or skills. The latest version of Dreamweaver boasts enhanced capabilities and this exciting book-and-downloadable video training package makes learning the new features of Dreamweaver less intimidating. Sixteen self-paced lessons explain how to design, develop, and maintain a fully functioning site. The complementary lessons featured in the video tutorials are each approximately five minutes long and demonstrate the concepts and features covered in the lesson.Features full-color, step-by-step tutorials that complement the topics covered in each lessonWalks you through the basics of the newest release of Dreamweaver, such as applying style sheets, using dynamic HTML, adding style with images and multimedia, and publishing and maintaining a Web siteAddresses how to use hyperlinks to navigate throughout a Website or link to other sites on the Internet and use databases to create dynamic Web sitesIt's not a dream--Dreamweaver CS5 Digital Classroom really is just like having your own personal instructor guiding you through each lesson.Note: DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of eBook file. These materials are available for download upon purchase.

Hoot

by Carl Hiaasen

Unfortunately, Roy's first acquaintance in Florida is Dana Matherson, a well-known bully. Then again, if Dana hadn't been sinking his thumbs into Roy's temples and mashing his face against the school-bus window, Roy might never have spotted the running boy. And the running boy is intriguing: he was running away from the school bus, carried no books, and-here's the odd part-wore no shoes. Sensing a mystery, Roy sets himself on the boy's trail. The chase introduces him to potty-trained alligators, a fake-fart champion, some burrowing owls, a renegade eco-avenger, and several extremely poisonous snakes with unnaturally sparkling tails.Roy has most definitely arrived in Carl Hiaasen's Florida.From the Hardcover edition.

Protest at Selma

by David J. Garrow

A thorough and insightful account of the historic 1965 civil rights protest at Selma, Alabama, from the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography Bearing the Cross Vivid descriptions of violence and courageous acts fill David Garrow's account of the momentous 1965 protest at Selma, Alabama, in which the author illuminates the role of Martin Luther King Jr. in organizing the demonstrations that led to the landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965. Beyond a mere narration of events, Garrow provides an in-depth look at the political strategy of King and of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains how King's awareness of media coverage of the protests--especially reports of white violence against peaceful African American protestors--would elicit sympathy for the cause and lead to dramatic legislative change. Garrow's analysis of these tactics and of the news reports surrounding these events provides a deeper understanding of how civil rights activists utilized a nonviolent approach to achieve success in the face of great opposition and ultimately effected monumental political change.

The FBI and Martin Luther King, Jr.

by David J. Garrow

The author of Bearing the Cross, the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Martin Luther King Jr., exposes the government's massive surveillance campaign against the civil rights leader When US attorney general Robert F. Kennedy authorized a wiretap of Martin Luther King Jr.'s phones by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, he set in motion one of the most invasive surveillance operations in American history. Sparked by informant reports of King's alleged involvement with communists, the FBI amassed a trove of information on the civil rights leader. Their findings failed to turn up any evidence of communist influence, but they did expose sensitive aspects of King's personal life that the FBI went on to use in its attempts to mar his public image. Based on meticulous research into the agency's surveillance records, historian David Garrow illustrates how the FBI followed King's movements throughout the country, bugging his hotel rooms and tapping his phones wherever he went, in an obsessive quest to destroy his growing influence. Garrow uncovers the voyeurism and racism within J. Edgar Hoover's FBI while unmasking Hoover's personal desire to destroy King. The spying only intensified once King publicly denounced the Vietnam War, and the FBI continued to surveil him until his death. The FBI and Martin Luther King, Jr. clearly demonstrates an unprecedented abuse of power by the FBI and the government as a whole.

Bearing the Cross

by David J. Garrow

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize: The definitive biography of Martin Luther King Jr. In this monumental account of the life of Martin Luther King Jr., professor and historian David Garrow traces King's evolution from young pastor who spearheaded the 1955-56 bus boycott of Montgomery, Alabama, to inspirational leader of America's civil rights movement. Based on extensive research and more than seven hundred interviews, with subjects including Andrew Young, Jesse Jackson, and Coretta Scott King, Garrow paints a multidimensional portrait of a charismatic figure driven by his strong moral obligation to lead--and of the toll this calling took on his life. Bearing the Cross provides a penetrating account of King's spiritual development and his crucial role at the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, whose protest campaigns in Birmingham and Selma, Alabama, led to enactment of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965. This comprehensive yet intimate study reveals the deep sense of mission King felt to serve as an unrelenting crusader against prejudice, inequality, and violence, and his willingness to sacrifice his own life on behalf of his beliefs. Written more than twenty-five years ago, Bearing the Cross remains an unparalleled examination of the life of Martin Luther King Jr. and the legacy of the civil rights movement.

The Ice Child

by Elizabeth Cooke

One of history's great unsolved mysteries is the basis for Elizabeth Cooke's exhilarating and deeply moving extreme-adventure novel about Arctic exploration, survival, and the unshakable bond between parents and children In 1845 Sir John Franklin and his crew of 128 men set out for the Arctic in search of the Northwest Passage. They were never seen or heard from again. Now, in an eerie replay of that tragedy, renowned archaeologist and Cambridge professor Douglas Marshall has vanished in Greenland while attempting to solve the centuries-old mystery. When journalist Jo Harper interviews Marshall's wife, it is the beginning of her own obsession with the lost expedition . . . and with Douglas Marshall. This suspenseful, keenly touching tale of adventure, love, and survival shifts back and forth between the doomed 1845 voyage, told from the perspective of young ship hand Augustus Peterman, and Jo Harper's present-day relationship with an extraordinary man who will change her profoundly, inspiring her to undertake her own seemingly impossible journey.

The Girl in the Green Glass Mirror

by Elizabeth Cooke

A shared obsession with a Victorian painter brings together two strangers in Elizabeth Cooke's extraordinary novel about the timelessness of art and love Catherine Sergeant loses people. First her parents died, leaving her alone in the world. Now her husband, Robert, has just walked out without warning or explanation. Catherine conceals her pain and sticks to life's comforting routines, reporting for work as usual at the fine-arts auction house she co-owns. Then she meets widowed architect John Brigham. Catherine and John feel an immediate connection. They are both fascinated by the paintings of Richard Dadd, a Victorian artist who murdered his father and was locked away in an insane asylum. Interweaving the present with fleeting snapshots of the past--Dadd in moments of lunacy and lucidity that culminate in the act of creation--The Girl in the Green Glass Mirror takes readers to that exalted place where reality and creativity intersect. Filled with vibrant, unforgettable characters, it is a novel of discovery, reawakened passion, and the ability of art to shape lives and transcend madness, tragedy, and even time itself.

Showing 76 through 100 of 4,237 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.