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A Culinary History of Pittsburg County: Little Italy, Choctaw Beer & Lamb Fries

by David Cathey

Long before the era of the foodie, the little coal-mining town of Krebs set the standard for celebrating food in Oklahoma. Its reputation as the Sooner State's Little Italy began in the mid-1870s when Italian immigrants chased the coal boom to Pittsburg County, deep in the heart of the Choctaw Nation. After 150 years, Italians and Choctaw neighbors are now bound by pasta, homemade cheeses and sausages and native beer once brewed illegally in basement bathtubs and delivered by children from door to door. Stop by for a steak at GiaComo's, a Choc at Pete's Place, lamb fries at the Isle of Capri, gnocchi at Roseanna's or a gourd of caciocavallo at Lovera's--venues that have proven impervious to time and hardship. Join Food Dude Dave Cathey on a tour through this colorful and delicious history.

Historic Tales from Park County: Parked in the Past

by Laura Van Dusen

The geographic center of Colorado, Park County has long served as a recreational area for Denver and Colorado Springs residents looking to get away. The scene has not always been so idyllic. Marshal Cook was shot while investigating a loud party in Como in 1894, and rumors spread by the Michigan Creek School Board sent Benjamin Ratcliff on a killing spree in 1895. But the county's hardscrabble heritage includes triumphs as well as tragedies. In 1873, county seat Fairplay lost every business on Front Street to a horrific fire. But by 1878, they had rebuilt it all. It still stands today, a true testament to the strength of this old mining town. Journalist Laura Van Dusen shares these stories, outlining the many trials and successes of Park County's earliest settlers.

For the Love of Texas: Tell Me about the Revolution!

by George Christian Betsy Christian Chris A. Gruszka

Before Texas was a state in the United States, it was a state of Mexico called Coahuila y Tejas. Texans then--like Texans today--didn't like being told what to do. So in 1835, the land now known as Texas organized a revolt and fought for freedom from Mexico and for an independent Texas--that's right, Texas was a country But before it could gain independence, for over six months, Mexican troops under Santa Anna battled against the Texas colonists in a bloody war with effects Texans can still find today. Saddle up with Betsy and George Christian for an interactive, fun chapter in Texas history for kids that challenges them to ask questions about the history they're told and the world in which they live..

For the Love of Texas: Tell Me about the Colonists!

by George Christian Betsy Christian Chris A. Gruszka

Before Texas was Texas, it was a lot of things to a lot of different people. Comanche, Choctaw, French, Spanish, Mexican and more laid claim to Texas soil as their own, and no one wanted to share. The fights and alliances that arose out of the colonization of Texas shaped the state's future. Find out all about the beginning of the state and the colonists who helped pave the way for the Texas we now know. Saddle up with Betsy and George Christian for an interactive, fun chapter in Texas history for kids that challenges them to ask questions about the history they're told and the world in which they live.

Haunted Cheyenne

by Jill Pope

In 1867, at the spot where the Union Pacific Railroad crossed Crow Creek, the city of Cheyenne was born. Since then, the Magic City of the Plains has had a long history of hauntings. Drop into the Shadows Pub and Grill, and you may find yourself sharing a drink with a spectral patron from another era. Spend a night at the Historic Plains Hotel, and you may run into one of the many ghostly guests who refuse to check out. Even the Wrangler store seems to be home to a phantom cowboy. From the ghosts of the historic Depot and Rail Yard to the spirits that still linger in some of the city's private homes, this frontier town is filled with spooky happenings and chilling sightings. Join writer and guide Jill Pope on a tour of the stories behind this city's most chilling spots.

Oregon Sports Stories: History, Highlights & Reflections

by Bob Robinson

Oregon has its share of playmakers, dramatic finishes and legendary coaches. With humor and insight, Oregon native and longtime sportswriter Bob Robinson relates highlights from six decades of coverage throughout the state. Blazermania overruns the Rose City as the Trail Blazers take down the favored Philadelphia 76ers in 1977. Oregon State's Orange Express, coached by Ralph Miller, captivates the state in 1981 before a shocking stumble in the NCAA playoffs. University of Oregon's Bill Dellinger kickstarts the school's distance-running tradition with a stunning win in 1954. In the 1970s, Mouse Davis performs coaching magic at Portland State with his Run and Shoot football offense. In these twenty essays, Robinson offers a unique, behind-the-scenes account of some of Oregon's greatest sports moments and game-changing personalities.

Ann Arbor Beer: A Hoppy History of Tree Town Brewing

by David Bardallis

Ann Arbor has always been a beer-loving town. From the establishment of the first commercial brewery in 1838 through a century of German immigration down to today's local craft brew boom, the amber liquid looms large in Tree Town's quirky past and present. Find out how beer helped a former University of Michigan professor win a Nobel Prize. Discover the Ann Arbor doctor whose nationally bestselling home remedy book featured ale recipes. Learn which Michigan football legend pounded brewskis as part of his training regimen. Covering the exploits of famous poets, performers and prohibitionists, local author David Bardallis pops the cap off the big beer history of this little college town and leads readers to "the best beer you can drink" in Ann Arbor today.

A History of the Wallkill Central Schools

by A. J. Schenkman Elizabeth Werlau

When the Borden family arrived in the nineteenth century, educational opportunities in Ulster County were limited; classes rarely extended beyond the eighth grade. This changed when the philanthropic Bordens established their Borden Condensed Milk Company and gave Wallkill the means to construct one of the area's first high schools. In 1938, Central School District No. 1--incorporating the towns of Shawangunk, Plattekill, Gardiner, Marlborough, Newburgh and Montgomery--was formed after residents voted to consolidate the John G. Borden High School with surrounding one- and two-room schoolhouses. Although those early schoolhouses are now long gone, the proud tradition of education and service carries on in the Leptondale, Clare F. Ostrander and Plattekill Elementary Schools; the John G. Borden Middle School; and the Wallkill Senior High School. Local educators A.J. Schenkman and Elizabeth Werlau explore Wallkill Central School District's seventy-five years of educational excellence.

New Orleans Carnival Krewes: The History, Spirit & Secrets of Mardi Gras

by Rosary O'Neill Kim Marie Vaz

New Orleans is practically synonymous with Mardi Gras. Both evoke the parades, the beads, the costumes, the food--the pomp and circumstance. The carnival krewes are the backbone of this Big Easy tradition. Every year, different krewes put on extravagant parties and celebrations to commemorate the beginning of the Lenten season. Historic krewes like Comus, Rex and Zulu that date back generations are intertwined with the greater history of New Orleans itself. Today, new krewes are inaugurated and widen a once exclusive part of New Orleans society. Through careful and detailed research of over three hundred sources, including fifty interviews with members of these organizations, author and New Orleans native Rosary O'Neill explores this storied institution, its antebellum roots and its effects in the twenty-first century..

Philadelphia Spiritualism and the Curious Case of Katie King

by Stephanie Hoover

In the wake of the Civil War, Spiritualism--and its promises of communication with the dead--reached its peak as grieving families hoped to reunite with men lost in battle. In the face of an uncertain future, people sought comfort in the messages of mediums, and for Philadelphians, that reassurance was found in Katie King. Katie was a spirit who materialized at the seances of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Holmes--or so attendees believed. For eight months in 1874, she captivated every level of Philadelphia society, including Vice President Henry Wilson, who clamored to speak with the lovely apparition. When a believer-turned-skeptic decided to investigate Katie King for himself, the "spirit" was quickly revealed as a hoax. From the rise of Spiritualism in the city to the aftermath of the scandal, author Stephanie Hoover reveals the personalities and chicanery behind the curious case of Katie King.

W.L. Dow: The Architect Who Shaped Sioux Falls

by Jennifer Dumke

Wallace L. Dow's enduring legacy is visible throughout Sioux Falls and across South Dakota. His distinctive structures, whether civic buildings or private residences, are beholden to no single architectural style. A New Hampshire native, Dow was brought to the Dakota Territory in the 1880s by Governor Nehemiah Ordway. Dow quickly established himself as the preeminent architect of the Dakota prairie, designing iconic structures like Sioux Falls Courthouse and the penitentiary, as well as many beautiful private residences. Using local Sioux quartzite, Dow's buildings gave the emerging Dakota Territory an identity. Yet the architect himself remains something of a mystery. Join author and Dow documentarian Jennifer Dumke as she uncovers Dow's story, recounting the life and work of a true Sioux Falls original who left his mark statewide.

Lost Ski Areas of the Southern Adirondacks

by Jeremy K. Davis

The Adirondack region has long been a favorite of skiers, as its beautiful mountains and deep snow cover provide it with the perfect landscape. Downhill ski areas developed during the Great Depression, when New Yorkers looked for an affordable escape to beat the winter blues. Over the coming decades, ski areas expanded with new lifts, lodges and trails. Despite the popularity of the sport, many ski areas have disappeared, yet countless people still hold fond memories of them. Ski historian Jeremy Davis chronicles the history of these vanished ski areas with photographs and memories from those who enjoyed them, while also paying homage to restored and classic skiing opportunities still available in the Adirondacks.

St. Lawrence County in the War of 1812: Folly and Mischief

by John M. Austin

The fledgling United States struggled to keep its freedom from Great Britain during the War of 1812, but St. Lawrence County in upstate New York played a divided role. The region shared a border--as well as close personal and business associations--with British Canada and opposed the American embargo that disrupted these relationships. While some St. Lawrence men fought bravely for America, smuggling was a common way of life. Several small battles and skirmishes took place along the river, and a local merchant even influenced President Madison's decision-making. Local historian John Austin recounts these and other events, as well as the fascinating North Country characters who influenced them, in this book on St. Lawrence County in the War of 1812.

Hudson River Steamboat Catastrophes: Contests and Collisions

by J. Thomas Allison

Beginning in the mid-1800s, steamboats carried people between New York City and the Albany area on the Hudson River. Romantic images lull us into believing it was a quiet means of travel, but a crowded river, faulty equipment and the bravado of the captains resulted in at least one major catastrophe every year. Night boats collided and sank, carelessness caused boiler explosions, races put passengers at risk and fires would quickly swallow the wooden vessels. The grand "Empire of Troy "suffered many collisions. The "Swallow" broke in two on a rock, "Reindeer"'s explosion took forty lives at once and the "Oregon" and "C. Vanderbilt" entered into an epic and dangerous race. Collected from eyewitness accounts, these are some of the most exciting and frightening stories of peril aboard steamboats on the Hudson River.

Elinor Fry: A Legacy of Dance in Richmond

by Paul N. Herbert

In Richmond, no other name is more synonymous with dance than Elinor Fry. Helen Keller, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson and author Tom Wolfe were just some of the people with whom Fry connected in five decades of dance. From 1920 to 1970, Fry was involved, often accompanied by her beloved students, in nearly every major public event in the River City. Performing in an array of venues and photographed twice by "National Geographic," Fry was a blend of creativity and business savvy and a wonderful role model for thousands of children who learned dance in her studio. Join author and historian Paul Herbert as he celebrates Elinor Fry's spirit and exceptional achievements in the world of dance in Richmond.

Robert Henry: A Western Carolina Patriot

by Wayne Caldwell Richard Russell

Robert Henry is a character more suited for fiction than nonfiction. While just a boy, he fought with the Overmountain Men at Kings Mountain and battled British troops along the Catawba River. As a surveyor, he helped mark the boundary line between Tennessee and North Carolina. He had a long career as a prominent attorney and owned the famous Sulphur Springs resort. Yet while Henry is one of western North Carolina's most accomplished ancestors, he is also one of the most eccentric. He preferred to dress in moccasins and traveled with a walking stick nearly as tall as he. Some said he had the gift of foresight and was able to predict his own death. Join author Richard Russell as he navigates the unusual, contradictory and fascinating life of Robert Henry.

Kern County Sports Chronicles: Colorful Athletes of the Central Valley

by Bryce Martin

Moon Mullen was an integral member of George Halas's old Chicago Bears. Verl Lillywhite played on the mid-century San Francisco 49ers, integrating the pro football roommates' tradition by bunking with Joe "The Jet" Perry. Rodeo star Chuck Roberson doubled for John Wayne when the stunt work got dicey. Jay Carty played on the Los Angeles Lakers with Jerry West. George Culver tossed a no-hitter for the Cincinnati Reds. What these former athletes and others profiled in this collection have in common is Kern County, California, and the good fortune to have had Bryce Martin covering their careers. With decades of experience writing for top publications, former St. Louis Cardinals prospect Martin offers a collection of profiles that forms a veritable Kern County sports hall of fame.

Hidden History of Uptown and Edgewater

by Patrick Butler

If there's any place in Chicago that's been all things to all men, it has to be the corner of the city that is occupied by Edgewater and Uptown. Babe Ruth and Mahatma Gandhi found a place of refuge at the Edgewater Beach Hotel, but the locale has also been a sanctuary for Appalachian coal miners and Japanese Americans released from internment camps. Al Capone reportedly moved booze through a secret tunnel connecting the Green Mill and the Aragon Ballroom, "Burglar Cops" moonlit out of the Summerdale police station and a "Kitchen Revolt" by some not-very-ordinary housewives sent once-invulnerable machine ward boss Marty Tuchow on his way to Club Fed. Ferret out the hidden history of Uptown and Edgewater with veteran beat reporter Patrick Butler in this curio shop of forgotten people and places..

Trailer Food Diaries Cookbook: Portland Edition, Volume II

by Tiffany Harelik

Portlanders have always had a taste for fresh local foods served up with a lack of pretense. So it's no surprise that food carts have emerged as a popular way to showcase a variety of flavors to hungry locals. While the business is a competitive one, the most unique and culturally diverse food trucks are able to thrive. From new spins on old classics--like the meatball sub and the spinach salad--to innovative creations like the Sriracha Mix-a-Lot and Peppered Peanut Popcorn Brittle, food carts have established a presence as culinary gems in a city brimming with creative dining options. Join Tiffany Harelik, author of the Trailer Food Diaries Cookbook series, as she returns to Portland to celebrate this growing food revolution.

Murder & Mayhem in Mendon and Honeoye Falls: "Murderville" in Victorian New York

by Lynne Menz Diane Ham

The Town of Mendon and the Village of Honeoye Falls are today quiet western New York suburbs, but they weren't always so idyllic. In years past, the village was a center of commerce, manufacturing and railroads, and by the mid-nineteenth century, this prosperity brought with it an element of mayhem. Horse stealing was commonplace. Saloons and taverns were abundant. Street scuffles and barroom brawls were regular, especially on Saturday nights, after the laborers were paid. By Sunday morning, numerous drunks--like Manley Locke, who would eventually go on to kill another man in a fight--were confined to the "lockup" in the village hall. It was at this time that the Village of Honeoye Falls earned the name "Murderville." As the town and village turn two hundred, join local historians Diane Ham and Lynne Menz as they explore the peaceful region's vicious history.

Virginia's Legendary Santa Trains

by Donna Strother Deekens Doug Riddell

Beginning in the 1950s, department stores around the Commonwealth teamed up with rail lines to create a magical Christmas adventure: the Santa Train. Delight-filled children from Richmond and Alexandria to Roanoke flocked to see and ride the trains sponsored by Miller & Rhoads, Cox's Department Store, J.C. Penney and many others. These majestic trains rode the rails across Virginia with old Saint Nick himself. Join railroad author Doug Riddell and former Miller & Rhoads Snow Queen Donna Strother Deekens as they recount heartwarming memories of Christmases past and chronicle the history of Virginia's Kris Kringle trains.

Enchanted Forest, The: Memories of Maryland's Storybook Park

by Janet Kusterer Martha Anne Clark

The history of the Enchanted Forest is one of magical beginnings. When it first opened in 1955, Ellicott City's storybook land became the first children's theme park on the East Coast. Young visitors could climb aboard rides like the Little Toot tugboat, Mother Goose and Ali Baba or encounter animals like peacocks and burros. Upon its closing in 1989, Marylanders who cherished memories of the Enchanted Forest were deeply disappointed. However, many of the park's beloved figures were moved to nearby Clark's Elioak Farm, where they were restored and displayed to the delight of new generations. Even today, the farm is a popular destination that evokes the whimsical spirit of the iconic park. Local author Janet Kusterer and Martha Anne Clark of Elioak Farm trace the park's history through vintage images and interviews with the Harrison family, former employees and visitors. Join Kusterer and Clark to rediscover the magic of the Enchanted Forest.

Haunted Utica: Mohawk Valley Ghosts and Other Historic Haunts

by Dennis Webster Bernadette Peck

Once a bustling hub on the Erie Canal, Utica and the surrounding region still harbor some spirits from the industrial age. "Old Main," Utica's shuttered psychiatric hospital, is one of the most haunted sites in New York State. John and Mary Jane Munn still walk the lavish halls of their castle on Rutger Street. Shrouded in secrecy, the Newport Masonic Temple's "Brotherhood of the Leather Apron" includes a ghostly membership. Otherworldly visitors also inhabit the Stanley Theater, Forest Hill Cemetery, the Madison House and many other historic locales. Follow Dennis Webster, Bernadette Peck and the Ghost Seekers of Central New York as they delve into the region's supernatural past.

A History of East Tennessee Auto Racing: The Thrill of the Mountains

by David Mcgee

East Tennessee isn't typically mentioned among stock car racing's formative hotbeds. But the region from Bristol to Oneida and Chattanooga encapsulates a significant portion of the sport's history. From pioneers like Brownie King and Paul Lewis of Johnson City to former national champions Joe Lee Johnson of Chattanooga and L.D. Ottinger of Newport, East Tennessee has produced many of NASCAR's great drivers. The region is home to one of the world's largest sports stadiums in the Bristol Motor Speedway, but NASCAR also made regular visits to other area tracks. Whether the surface is red clay, asphalt or brushed concrete, East Tennessee still boasts some of the world's fastest, most competitive racing. Join author and racing insider David McGee as he presents a vast array of colorful characters whose passion fueled a sport that has gone from primitive to prime time.

On This Day in Memphis History

by G. Wayne Dowdy

Far more than blues and barbecue, Memphis culture has evolved one day at a time. Author G. Wayne Dowdy pins an exact date to a host of important, quirky and forgotten events in the history of Tennessee's largest city--an entertaining footnote for each day of the year. Earth, Wind and Fire founder Maurice White entered the world in a Memphis hospital on December 19, 1941. On January 15, 1877, a severe thunderstorm mysteriously left the city covered in snakes. On December 31, 1902, a resident was murdered on Main Street after taunting a Native American named Creeping Bear. A day or a month at a time, enjoy a year of entertaining River City blasts from the past.

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