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Rhode Island Clam Shacks

by David Norton Stone Christopher Scott Martin

Steamships once plied the waters of Narragansett Bay, carrying thousands of guests to feasts of clams prepared in every way imaginable at scenic spots like Rocky Point and Crescent Park. After hurricanes and pollution destroyed Rhode Island’s soft-shell clam and oyster beds, the quahog became the state’s favorite bivalve, and Rhode Islanders took to their automobiles and drove to the beach for clam cakes and chowder at the shacks and chowder houses that carried on the old traditions. Quahogging remains a major business in Rhode Island, where men and women continue to make a living from the sea. The long lines at take-out windows attest that the future of Rhode Island’s clam shacks is secure as they successfully balance changing tastes with time-honored recipes.

Lysistrata

by Sarah Ruden Aristophanes

This rollicking new translation of Aristophanes' comic masterpiece is rendered in blank verse for dialogue and in lyric meters and free verse for the songs. Appended commentary essays--on Athenian democracy, ancient Greek warfare, Athenian women, and Greek Comedy--offer lively and informative discussions not only of Aristophanes, but of the broader fifth-century social, political, and cultural context as well.

Some Permanent Things

by James Wilson

In James Matthew Wilson's newest collection of poems he continues to show his command of major themes of many ranges of contemporary experience in a style that is unusually complex, but always exact, profound and deeply insightful. In this new book, his best poems, those concerning matters of the soul, place him among the finest poets writing today.

Spiritual Emergency: When Personal Transformation Becomes A Crisis

by Christina Grof Stanislav Grof

From Spiritual Emergency to Healing and Rebirth Increasing numbers of people involved in personal transformation are experiencing spiritual emergencies -- crises when the process of growth and change becomes chaotic and overwhelming. Individuals experiencing such episodes may feel that their sense of identity is breaking down, that their old values no longer hold true, and that the very ground beneath their personal realities is radically shifting. In many cases, new realms of mystical and spiritual experience enter their lives suddenly and dramatically, resulting in fear and confusion. They may feel tremendous anxiety, have difficulty coping with their daily lives, jobs, and relationships, and may even fear for their own sanity. Unfortunately, much of modern psychiatry has failed to distinguish these episodes from mental illness. As a result, transformational crises are often suppressed by routine psychiatric care, medication, and even institutionalization. However, there is a new perspective developing among many mental health professionals and those studying spiritual development that views such crises as transformative breakthroughs that can hold tremendous potential for physical and emotional healing. When understood and treated in a supportive manner, spiritual emergencies can become gateways to higher levels of functioning and new ways of being. In this book, foremost psychologists, psychiatrists, and spiritual teachers address the following questions: What is spiritual emergency? What is the relationship between spirituality, "madness," and healing? What forms does spiritual emergency take? What are the pitfalls -- and promises -- of spiritual practice? How can people in spiritual emergency be assisted by family, friends, and professionals? This groundbreaking work reveals that within the crisis of spiritual emergency lies the promise of spiritual emergence and renewal.

The American Community College Sixth Edition

by Carrie B. Kisker Florence B. Brawer Arthur M. Cohen

Since 1982, The American Community College by Cohen and Brawer has been the authoritative book on community colleges. Anyone who wants to understand these complex and dynamic institutions—how they are evolving, the contributions they make, the challenges they face, the students they serve, and the faculty and leaders who deliver the services and the curricula—will find The American Community College both essential reading and an important reference book.

The New Social Story™ Book Revised and Expanded 15th Anniversary Edition

by Carol Gray

Since the early 90s, Carol Gray's world-famous Social Stories have helped thousands of children with autism spectrum disorders. This 15th Anniversary Edition of her best-selling book offers ready-to-use stories that parents and educators have depended on for years, and new sections added are: How to most effectively use and apply the stories; How to improve the lives of younger children; and Social Stories for teens and adults with autism. Developed through years of experience, these strategically written stories explain social situations in ways children and adults with autism understand, while teaching social skills needed for them to be successful at home, school, work, and in the community.

Cape St. George Lighthouse and Apalachicola Bay

by James L. Hargrove Carol A. Talley

The beacon of the historic Cape St. George Lighthouse still guides mariners into Apalachicola Bay. Founded in 1831, the town of Apalachicola took its name from Creek Indians, to whom it signified a land of friendly people. Sheltered from the Gulf of Mexico by a string of barrier islands, the port flourished as the only site in Florida on a river that is navigable for over 300 miles to the fall line at Columbus, Georgia, Apalachicola’s sister city. Generations of lighthouse keepers were bound to St. George Island and its great bay by an intense sense of duty to sustain seagoing commerce and a love for a place where they could raise their families in freedom. When the foundation washed away in 2005 after a very active hurricane season and a final surge from Hurricane Wilma, residents took action to salvage and rebuild the historic lighthouse. Visitors may still climb the lighthouse tower, surrounded by bricks that were first laid in 1852.

Philadelphia Mummers

by Stephen M. Highsmith

The Philadelphia Mummers are costumed individuals and families who celebrate by “strutting” and performing on New Year’s Day. For many, mummery is also a way of life. The first official parade occurred in 1901, but it is an evolving tradition, reflecting both the challenges and opportunities of changing times. Philadelphia Mummers tells the story of modern-day mummery and the expressions of art, freedom, and celebration of thousands of people who come together in the working-class spirit of America’s oldest annual folk parade.

University of Idaho

by President Chuck Staben Katherine G. Aiken Erin Passehl-Stoddart

Chroniclers have deemed the University of Idaho “The Beacon for Mountain and Plain” and “This Crested Hill”—both are apt monikers for Idaho’s land grant and comprehensive research university. For over 125 years, the University of Idaho has served the people of Idaho, the nation, and the world. Among the institution’s more than 100,000 graduates are US senators, members of Congress, and Idaho governors; Olympic gold medalists, professional athletes, and coaches; the country’s first Native American astronaut; writers, journalists, and filmmakers; educators; and business and community leaders. Extension offices in 42 of 44 counties and three regional centers bring the University of Idaho to every corner of the state; the institution’s economic impact tops $1 billion per year. As the state’s first university, the University of Idaho looks to a bright future of serving students and contributing to economic and social progress for Idaho and beyond. This book commemorates the proud heritage and innovative spirit of students, faculty, and staff who have shaped the history of the University of Idaho, featuring images from the library’s extensive Special Collections and Archives department.

Nashville's Streetcars and Interurban Railways

by Ralcon Wagner

Nashville’s 150-year public transportation heritage is a rich and colorful one that began in 1866 when two private companies, the McGavock and Mount Vernon Horse Railroad Company and the South Nashville Street Railroad Company, commenced operation. The first cars were mule powered. During the 1880s, as streetcar routes became longer and too strenuous for animal power, steam dummy lines were introduced. On April 30, 1889, Nashville became one of the earliest cities served by electric street railways, developing a 70-mile system by 1915. In addition to its advanced streetcar system, Nashville was also served by two interurban railway systems. Over time, improved roads and affordable cars caused ridership on public transportation to drop rapidly. By February 1941, buses had replaced the last of the city’s aging streetcars. The traction era had come to an end.

Naperville

by Jo Fredell Higgins

Naperville is a quintessential American city, where many cultures blend together in harmony. Founded in 1831 by Capt. Joseph Naper and incorporated in 1857, the city has progressed from rural farmland to a robust commercial economy. In 1860, kerosene lamps and one wooden bridge were surrounded by the sounds of prairie fowl and croaking frogs. In 1960, the population exploded. Now, 21 languages are spoken in the community, and the meandering downtown Naperville Riverwalk offers bucolic serenity to those strolling along the Century Walk artwork. Naperville has two partner Sister Cities that strengthen culture and business: Nitra, Slovakia (as of 1993), and Pátzcuaro, Mexico (as of 2010). The city comes alive thanks to its people and families, organizations, leaders, and events. It is filled with a rich culture that values the history of yesterday while looking forward to tomorrow’s joys. Naperville is simply outstanding in every manner and mode of living.

Iconic Restaurants of Ann Arbor

by Jon Milan Gail Offen Ari Weinzweig

What is an iconic Ann Arbor restaurant? Ask anyone who has ever spent time there as a student, traveler, or “townie,” and they are likely to name several favorites in an instant. From debating the best place to celebrate or console on football Saturdays to deciding where to eat after the bars close, the choices have always sparked passionate conversation. In Ann Arbor, people are known to have strong feelings about the best places for pizza, coffee, beer, burgers, noodles, and burritos. Although many of the go-to hangouts are long gone, a surprising number still thrive. And there are always a few newcomers coming along to win the hearts of the next generation of diners, nibblers, and noshers. Some are fine restaurants and taverns, and others are lunch counters, diners, carry-outs, and drive-ins—but in each and every case, they are unique and together make up a collection of iconic local eateries.

Circle Z Guest Ranch

by Gail Waechter Corkill

Nestled in Sonoita Valley along the banks of Sonoita Creek, just 15 miles north of Mexico, Circle Z Guest Ranch welcomes vacationers to experience a taste of the Old West, with the comfortable pleasures of a traditional family-style ranch but without the risks. Horseback riding, relaxation, and cowboy cookouts have been the ranch’s main attractions for the past 90 years, earning Circle Z the distinction of being the oldest continuously operating guest ranch in Arizona. It evolved from a four-room adobe homestead to a working cattle ranch before becoming a highly profitable sheepherding operation. In 1924, brothers Carl and Lee Zinsmeister arrived in Patagonia with a vision of developing a dude ranch with a resort feel. They purchased 5,000 acres of the San José de Sonoita land grant, which included the Sanford estate. Circle Z opened in 1926 and quickly became one of the finest guest ranches in the state. Today, the Nash family operates this memorable ranch famous for its well-trained horses and miles of scenic trails.

Battleship Texas, The

by Mark Lardas

The USS Texas was built when dreadnought battleships were kings of the seas. It was the world’s most powerful battleship when first commissioned in 1914, and for over a century it fought many battles. Some took place while the Texas served as a warship in the US Navy in World Wars I and II. Since becoming a museum ship and war memorial in 1948, it has fought a longer and more difficult struggle as it combats the ravages of time for its very survival. Throughout its existence, the Texas has made history, leaving a wealth of fascinating stories in its wake.

Around Remsen and Steuben

by Megan Plete Postol

The first settlers of the rugged wilderness that became the towns of Remsen and Steuben were hearty pioneers, Welsh immigrants, and a famous Revolutionary War hero. The untamed forest of Oneida County proved challenging but not insurmountable for Remsen’s first settler Barnabas Mitchell and the noble Friedrich Wilhelm August Heinrich Ferdinand Steuben, who was famed with being the sturdy backbone of Washington’s Continental Army and known as the “Drillmaster of the Revolution.” The area flourished into a place of farming, manufacturing, business, and religion. Settlers ranged from rollicking woodsmen to large working families to pious pastors. There were so many churches that the lands of Steuben became known as “the singing hills.” It has been said that the courage of a Welshman rises in proportion to the obstacles thrown in his path. This book strives to tell their tales through visuals of old Remsen and Steuben.

Jewish Community of Hartford

by Jewish Historical Society of Greater Hartford

Hartford’s Jewish presence dates back to the mid-1600s. The earliest permanent settlers were German Jews, who purchased the first building for use as a synagogue in 1856. With increasing immigration from Eastern Europe, the population soon expanded. Jewish-owned businesses became part of Hartford’s economic life, and numerous civic and social welfare organizations were established. In 1945, many philanthropic groups consolidated to create the Jewish Federation of Greater Hartford, which later relocated to West Hartford as the community shifted to the surrounding suburbs. Among the Hartford area’s most accomplished sons and daughters are entertainer Sophie Tucker, producer Norman Lear, comedienne Totie Fields, artist Sol LeWitt, and significant Zionist leaders, such as Samuel Hoffenberg and Abraham Goldstein. The Jewish Community of Hartford highlights some of the people and institutions that have helped to shape this remarkable community.

Chimney Rock National Monument

by Amron Gravett Glenn Raby Christine Robinette

The appreciation of the Chimney Rock region goes back more than 1,000 years. Here in southwestern Colorado, the Ancestral Puebloans inhabited the northern San Juan River Basin as an outlier community of Chaco Canyon. Its function and use has created much conjecture. The site was abandoned by the early 1100s for reasons that some speculate were related to drought, resource depletion, warfare, migration, or a combination of these factors. Over the course of its recorded history, archaeologists, astronomers, regional historians, and visitors have celebrated the rocks, ruins, and landscape that make up this important feature in the Four Corners region. It has been called La Piedra Parada by Spanish explorers, Fire Mountain by Tewa-speaking pueblos, and Tupiwiniri by the Utes. Today, we know it as Chimney Rock National Monument due to a proclamation made in 2012 by Pres. Barack Obama.

Political Islam in Tunisia: The History of Ennahda

by Anne Wolf

Political Islam in Tunisia uncovers the secret history of Tunisia's main Islamist movement, Ennahda, from its origins in the 1960s to the present. Banned until the popular uprisings of 2010-11 and the overthrow of Ben Ali's dictatorship, Ennahda has until now been impossible to investigate. This is the first in-depth account of the movement, one of Tunisia's most influential political actors.Based on more than four years of field research, over 400 interviews, and access to private archives, Anne Wolf masterfully unveils the evolution of Ennahda's ideological and strategic orientations within changing political contexts and, at times, conflicting ambitions amongst its leading cadres. She also explores the challenges to Ennahda's quest for power from both secularists and Salafis. As the first full history of Ennahda, this book is a major contribution to the literature on Tunisia, Islamist movements, and political Islam in the Arab world. It will be indispensable reading for anyone seeking to understand the forces driving a key player in the country most hopeful of pursuing a democratic trajectory in the wake of the Arab Spring.

The Vision of the Soul: Truth, Beauty, and Goodness in the Western Tradition

by James Matthew Wilson

Story-telling is foundational to the forms of the fine arts, but it is no less foundational to human reason. Human life in turn constitutes a specific kind of form―a story form. The ancient conception of human life as a pilgrimage to beauty itself is one that we can fully embrace only if we see the essential correlation between reason and story and the essential convertibility of truth, goodness and beauty in beauty. By turns a study in fundamental ontology, aesthetics, and political philosophy, Wilson's book invites its readers to a renewal of the West's intellectual tradition.

Way of the Warrior Kid: From Wimpy to Warrior the Navy Seal Way

by Jocko Willink

Fifth grade was the worst year of Marc's life. He stunk at gym class, math was too hard for him, the school lunch was horrible, and his class field trip was ruined because he couldn't swim. But what was the most awful thing about fifth grade? Kenny Williamson, the class bully, who calls himself the "King of the Jungle. " When Marc's mother tells him that his Uncle Jake is coming to stay for the whole summer, Marc can't wait. Uncle Jake is a for real, super-cool Navy SEAL. And Uncle Jake has a plan. He's going to turn Marc into a warrior. Becoming a warrior isn't easy. It means a lot of pull ups, sit ups, pushups, squats, swimming, eating right, and studying harder than ever before! Can Marc transform himself into a warrior before school starts in the fall - and finally stand up to the King of the Jungle himself? The Way of the Warrior Kid is a new illustrated chapter book by #1New York Times-bestselling author and retired Navy SEAL Jocko Willink.

Black Ice (Young Sherlock #3)

by Andrew Lane

In 1868, teenaged Sherlock Holmes faces danger in a train station for the dead, a museum of curiosities, and downtown Moscow as he helps his brother, Mycroft, who has been framed for murder.

Microeconomics: Principles, Applications, and Tools (Eighth Edition)

by Steven M. Sheffrin Stephen J. Perez Arthur O'Sullivan

For Principles of Microeconomics courses. Microeconomics: Principles, Applications, and Tools, is also suitable for economists, financial analysts and other finance professionals. Questions that drive interest, applications that illustrate concepts, and the tools to test and solidify comprehension. Students come into their first Economics course thinking they will gain a better understanding of the economy around them. Unfortunately, they often leave with many unanswered questions. To ensure students actively internalize economics, O'Sullivan/Sheffrin/Perez use chapter-opening questions to spark interest on important economic concepts, applications that vividly illustrate those concepts, and chapter-ending tools that test and solidify understanding.

Performance Evaluation: Proven Approaches for Improving Program and Organizational Performance

by Ingrid J. Guerra-López

Performance Evaluation is a hands-on text for practitioners, researchers, educators, and students in how to use scientifically-based evaluations that are both rigorous and flexible. Author Ingrid Guerra-López, an internationally-known evaluation expert, introduces the foundations of evaluation and presents the most applicable models for the performance improvement field. Her book offers a wide variety of tools and techniques that have proven successful and is organized to illustrate evaluation in the context of continual performance improvement.

Organization Development: A Jossey-Bass Reader

by Joan V. Gallos Edgar H. Schein

This is the third book in the Jossey-Bass Reader series, Organization Development: A Jossey-Bass Reader. This collection will introduce the key thinkers and contributors in organization development including Ed Lawler, Peter Senge, Chris Argyris, Richard Hackman, Jay Galbraith, Cooperrider, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Bolman & Deal, Kouzes & Posner, and Ed Schein, among others. "Without reservations I recommend this volume to those students of organizational behavior who want an encyclopedia of OD to gain a perspective on the past, present, and future...." Jonathan D. Springer of the American Psychological Association.

Developing Learner-Centered Teaching: A Practical Guide for Faculty

by Phyllis Blumberg Maryellen Weimer

Developing Learner-Centered Teaching offers a step-by-step plan for transforming any course from teacher-centered to the more engaging learner-centered model. Filled with self-assessments and worksheets that are based on each of the five practices identified in Maryellen Weimer's Learner-Centered Teaching, this groundbreaking book gives instructors, faculty developers, and instructional designers a practical and effective resource for putting the learner-centered model into action.

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